Jun 26, 2019
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Academy Award picks from CP film writer Lee Anne Goodman

TORONTO Here are the Oscar picks in major categories from CP film writer Lee-Anne Goodman:

Best Picture: "Little Miss Sunshine." It started the Oscar race as a dark horse but is now considered a film with a genuine shot at pulling off a "Crash"-style upset. Comparisons to "Crash" should end there, however _ "Little Miss Sunshine" is a far superior movie, and the only film in the pack that possesses a sense of fun and optimism amid the dark subject matter. This is a road movie people will watch in 20 years and still adore.

Best Actor: Forest Whitaker will win, despite gripes from some critics that his role in "The Last King of Scotland" was just an exercise in mimicry. Peter O’Toole, however, is the sentimental favourite and could stage an upset following a long and distinguished acting career that has never been granted any Oscar recognition (though he did win an honorary statue despite complaining he wanted "to win the bugger outright"). His role as a lecherous old man in "Venus," however, has been deemed a bit creepy for some.

Best Actress: It’s a slam dunk for Helen Mirren, and rightfully so. She goes beyond a mere imitation of Queen Elizabeth to lend a real pathos and humanity to her role in "The Queen." While all the other candidates in this category _ Judi Dench, Kate Winslet, Penelope Cruz and Meryl Streep _ would all be worthy winners, this is Mirren’s year.

Best Supporting Actor: While Eddie Murphy will likely win for "Dreamgirls," Alan Arkin deserves the prize for his brilliant portrayal of a debauched but devoted grandfather to little Olive in "Little Miss Sunshine." The veteran actor steals every scene he’s in, and if Murphy’s dubious "Norbit" follow-up truly has hurt his Oscar chances, watch for Arkin to snatch the trophy away.

Best Supporting Actress: Jennifer Hudson will win for "Dreamgirls," but shouldn’t. And her acceptance speech will likely be the last time anyone hears from her again in terms of acting glory. She was a refreshing bright spot in a mediocre movie but Cate Blanchett’s turn in "Notes on a Scandal" was a far more skilled and nuanced performance.

Best Director: Another slam dunk category: Martin Scorsese will win it, not just because "The Departed" was considered one of the best films of the year, but also because academy voters feel guilty that the legendary filmmaker _ the man behind "Raging Bull," "Taxi Driver" and "Goodfellas" _ has yet to take home an Oscar.

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Front Page, Industry News

Academy Award picks from CP film writer Lee Anne Goodman

TORONTO Here are the Oscar picks in major categories from CP film writer Lee-Anne Goodman:

Best Picture: "Little Miss Sunshine." It started the Oscar race as a dark horse but is now considered a film with a genuine shot at pulling off a "Crash"-style upset. Comparisons to "Crash" should end there, however _ "Little Miss Sunshine" is a far superior movie, and the only film in the pack that possesses a sense of fun and optimism amid the dark subject matter. This is a road movie people will watch in 20 years and still adore.

Best Actor: Forest Whitaker will win, despite gripes from some critics that his role in "The Last King of Scotland" was just an exercise in mimicry. Peter O’Toole, however, is the sentimental favourite and could stage an upset following a long and distinguished acting career that has never been granted any Oscar recognition (though he did win an honorary statue despite complaining he wanted "to win the bugger outright"). His role as a lecherous old man in "Venus," however, has been deemed a bit creepy for some.

Best Actress: It’s a slam dunk for Helen Mirren, and rightfully so. She goes beyond a mere imitation of Queen Elizabeth to lend a real pathos and humanity to her role in "The Queen." While all the other candidates in this category _ Judi Dench, Kate Winslet, Penelope Cruz and Meryl Streep _ would all be worthy winners, this is Mirren’s year.

Best Supporting Actor: While Eddie Murphy will likely win for "Dreamgirls," Alan Arkin deserves the prize for his brilliant portrayal of a debauched but devoted grandfather to little Olive in "Little Miss Sunshine." The veteran actor steals every scene he’s in, and if Murphy’s dubious "Norbit" follow-up truly has hurt his Oscar chances, watch for Arkin to snatch the trophy away.

Best Supporting Actress: Jennifer Hudson will win for "Dreamgirls," but shouldn’t. And her acceptance speech will likely be the last time anyone hears from her again in terms of acting glory. She was a refreshing bright spot in a mediocre movie but Cate Blanchett’s turn in "Notes on a Scandal" was a far more skilled and nuanced performance.

Best Director: Another slam dunk category: Martin Scorsese will win it, not just because "The Departed" was considered one of the best films of the year, but also because academy voters feel guilty that the legendary filmmaker _ the man behind "Raging Bull," "Taxi Driver" and "Goodfellas" _ has yet to take home an Oscar.

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You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Academy Award picks from CP film writer Lee Anne Goodman

TORONTO Here are the Oscar picks in major categories from CP film writer Lee-Anne Goodman:

Best Picture: "Little Miss Sunshine." It started the Oscar race as a dark horse but is now considered a film with a genuine shot at pulling off a "Crash"-style upset. Comparisons to "Crash" should end there, however _ "Little Miss Sunshine" is a far superior movie, and the only film in the pack that possesses a sense of fun and optimism amid the dark subject matter. This is a road movie people will watch in 20 years and still adore.

Best Actor: Forest Whitaker will win, despite gripes from some critics that his role in "The Last King of Scotland" was just an exercise in mimicry. Peter O’Toole, however, is the sentimental favourite and could stage an upset following a long and distinguished acting career that has never been granted any Oscar recognition (though he did win an honorary statue despite complaining he wanted "to win the bugger outright"). His role as a lecherous old man in "Venus," however, has been deemed a bit creepy for some.

Best Actress: It’s a slam dunk for Helen Mirren, and rightfully so. She goes beyond a mere imitation of Queen Elizabeth to lend a real pathos and humanity to her role in "The Queen." While all the other candidates in this category _ Judi Dench, Kate Winslet, Penelope Cruz and Meryl Streep _ would all be worthy winners, this is Mirren’s year.

Best Supporting Actor: While Eddie Murphy will likely win for "Dreamgirls," Alan Arkin deserves the prize for his brilliant portrayal of a debauched but devoted grandfather to little Olive in "Little Miss Sunshine." The veteran actor steals every scene he’s in, and if Murphy’s dubious "Norbit" follow-up truly has hurt his Oscar chances, watch for Arkin to snatch the trophy away.

Best Supporting Actress: Jennifer Hudson will win for "Dreamgirls," but shouldn’t. And her acceptance speech will likely be the last time anyone hears from her again in terms of acting glory. She was a refreshing bright spot in a mediocre movie but Cate Blanchett’s turn in "Notes on a Scandal" was a far more skilled and nuanced performance.

Best Director: Another slam dunk category: Martin Scorsese will win it, not just because "The Departed" was considered one of the best films of the year, but also because academy voters feel guilty that the legendary filmmaker _ the man behind "Raging Bull," "Taxi Driver" and "Goodfellas" _ has yet to take home an Oscar.

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You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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