Dec 03, 2020
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Canadian screenwriters join day of solidarity for U.S. film and TV writers

Canadian screenwriters will join an international day of solidarity to show support for striking U.S. film and TV writers on Nov. 28.

"Their fight is our fight," said Writers Guild of Canada president Rebecca Schechter in a statement. "Screenwriters around the world are entitled to receive their fair share of revenues from the Internet, and that is what our American colleagues are fighting for."

At a meeting in Montreal yesterday, the International Affiliation of Writers Guilds – representing more than 21,000 screenwriters around the world – announced the decision to support the Writers Guild of America, whose members have been on strike since Nov. 5 after the collapse of three months of negotiations on a new contract.

Demonstrations will take place in a number of Canadian cities but details have yet to be determined, according to Writers Guild of Canada spokesman David Kinahan. The guild represents 1,800 writers working in Canadian film, television, radio and new media production.

Writers in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Mexico and France will hold their own demonstrations.

"The future of our industry is shifting toward new media," Katharine Way, chairwoman of the Writers Guild of Great Britain, in a statement. "Writers have always had to fight for a small share of the revenues generated from their work and this case is no different."

The action by the American Writers Guild against the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers is the first industry-wide strike since 1988, when a strike lasted five months and cost an estimated $500 million.

The U.S. writers want more money from movies and television shows released on DVD, and a bigger share of the revenue from movies and shows broadcast over the Internet.

Shortly after the U.S. writers began their strike, the Writers Guild of Canada instructed its members not to accept work from U.S. producers trying to replace striking American writers.

About 265 Canadian writers belong to both the Canadian and American guilds. Those living in the U.S. were told to abide by American strike rules, while those living in Canada can work for Canadian producers.

<font size=1>Source: CanWest News Service</font>

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Front Page, Industry News

Canadian screenwriters join day of solidarity for U.S. film and TV writers

Canadian screenwriters will join an international day of solidarity to show support for striking U.S. film and TV writers on Nov. 28.

"Their fight is our fight," said Writers Guild of Canada president Rebecca Schechter in a statement. "Screenwriters around the world are entitled to receive their fair share of revenues from the Internet, and that is what our American colleagues are fighting for."

At a meeting in Montreal yesterday, the International Affiliation of Writers Guilds – representing more than 21,000 screenwriters around the world – announced the decision to support the Writers Guild of America, whose members have been on strike since Nov. 5 after the collapse of three months of negotiations on a new contract.

Demonstrations will take place in a number of Canadian cities but details have yet to be determined, according to Writers Guild of Canada spokesman David Kinahan. The guild represents 1,800 writers working in Canadian film, television, radio and new media production.

Writers in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Mexico and France will hold their own demonstrations.

"The future of our industry is shifting toward new media," Katharine Way, chairwoman of the Writers Guild of Great Britain, in a statement. "Writers have always had to fight for a small share of the revenues generated from their work and this case is no different."

The action by the American Writers Guild against the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers is the first industry-wide strike since 1988, when a strike lasted five months and cost an estimated $500 million.

The U.S. writers want more money from movies and television shows released on DVD, and a bigger share of the revenue from movies and shows broadcast over the Internet.

Shortly after the U.S. writers began their strike, the Writers Guild of Canada instructed its members not to accept work from U.S. producers trying to replace striking American writers.

About 265 Canadian writers belong to both the Canadian and American guilds. Those living in the U.S. were told to abide by American strike rules, while those living in Canada can work for Canadian producers.

<font size=1>Source: CanWest News Service</font>

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Canadian screenwriters join day of solidarity for U.S. film and TV writers

Canadian screenwriters will join an international day of solidarity to show support for striking U.S. film and TV writers on Nov. 28.

"Their fight is our fight," said Writers Guild of Canada president Rebecca Schechter in a statement. "Screenwriters around the world are entitled to receive their fair share of revenues from the Internet, and that is what our American colleagues are fighting for."

At a meeting in Montreal yesterday, the International Affiliation of Writers Guilds – representing more than 21,000 screenwriters around the world – announced the decision to support the Writers Guild of America, whose members have been on strike since Nov. 5 after the collapse of three months of negotiations on a new contract.

Demonstrations will take place in a number of Canadian cities but details have yet to be determined, according to Writers Guild of Canada spokesman David Kinahan. The guild represents 1,800 writers working in Canadian film, television, radio and new media production.

Writers in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Mexico and France will hold their own demonstrations.

"The future of our industry is shifting toward new media," Katharine Way, chairwoman of the Writers Guild of Great Britain, in a statement. "Writers have always had to fight for a small share of the revenues generated from their work and this case is no different."

The action by the American Writers Guild against the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers is the first industry-wide strike since 1988, when a strike lasted five months and cost an estimated $500 million.

The U.S. writers want more money from movies and television shows released on DVD, and a bigger share of the revenue from movies and shows broadcast over the Internet.

Shortly after the U.S. writers began their strike, the Writers Guild of Canada instructed its members not to accept work from U.S. producers trying to replace striking American writers.

About 265 Canadian writers belong to both the Canadian and American guilds. Those living in the U.S. were told to abide by American strike rules, while those living in Canada can work for Canadian producers.

<font size=1>Source: CanWest News Service</font>

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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