Nov 29, 2020
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Stewart, Colbert to return Jan. 7

Fresh political satire will return to Comedy Central on Jan. 7 with or without script writers.

Comedians Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert followed their NBC late-night counterparts, Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien, in announcing that they will begin taping new shows in the new year despite the ongoing writers’ strike in Hollywood and New York City, which is crippling the entertainment industry.

As for late night comedy at CBS, the writers’ union will reportedly meet with David Letterman’s production company in an attempt to reach a separate deal that could bring back the "Late Show" to the air along with its writing staff.

"We would like to return to work with our writers," said Stewart and Colbert in a joint statement. "If we cannot, we would like to express our ambivalence, but without our writers we are unable to express something as nuanced as ambivalence."

Both The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report have been stuck in reruns since the strike began in early November, putting Comedy Central’s corporate parent, Viacom at risk for losing the big audience of one of its most successful TV franchises.

This month, negotiations between the writers and the film and TV studios have broke down, raising the prospect that the work stoppage will continue well into 2008. The absence of new scripts will get more painful for the industry as time wears on, but late-night comedy was one of the strike’s immediate casualties.

The shows of Stewart and Colbert have relied heavily on good scripts, raising questions about how they can rejuvenate their momentum without writers.

"Comedy Central forcing Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert back on the air will not give the viewers the quality shows they’ve come to expect," the Writers Guild of America West said in a statement. "The only way to get the writing staffs back on the job is for the (studios) to come back to the table prepared to negotiate a fair deal with the Writers Guild."

Shares of Viacom, which have gained ground since the strike began, recently were up 15 cents, or 0.3%, to $43.70.

<font size=1>Source: TheStreet.com/Variety</font>

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Front Page, Industry News

Stewart, Colbert to return Jan. 7

Fresh political satire will return to Comedy Central on Jan. 7 with or without script writers.

Comedians Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert followed their NBC late-night counterparts, Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien, in announcing that they will begin taping new shows in the new year despite the ongoing writers’ strike in Hollywood and New York City, which is crippling the entertainment industry.

As for late night comedy at CBS, the writers’ union will reportedly meet with David Letterman’s production company in an attempt to reach a separate deal that could bring back the "Late Show" to the air along with its writing staff.

"We would like to return to work with our writers," said Stewart and Colbert in a joint statement. "If we cannot, we would like to express our ambivalence, but without our writers we are unable to express something as nuanced as ambivalence."

Both The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report have been stuck in reruns since the strike began in early November, putting Comedy Central’s corporate parent, Viacom at risk for losing the big audience of one of its most successful TV franchises.

This month, negotiations between the writers and the film and TV studios have broke down, raising the prospect that the work stoppage will continue well into 2008. The absence of new scripts will get more painful for the industry as time wears on, but late-night comedy was one of the strike’s immediate casualties.

The shows of Stewart and Colbert have relied heavily on good scripts, raising questions about how they can rejuvenate their momentum without writers.

"Comedy Central forcing Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert back on the air will not give the viewers the quality shows they’ve come to expect," the Writers Guild of America West said in a statement. "The only way to get the writing staffs back on the job is for the (studios) to come back to the table prepared to negotiate a fair deal with the Writers Guild."

Shares of Viacom, which have gained ground since the strike began, recently were up 15 cents, or 0.3%, to $43.70.

<font size=1>Source: TheStreet.com/Variety</font>

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Stewart, Colbert to return Jan. 7

Fresh political satire will return to Comedy Central on Jan. 7 with or without script writers.

Comedians Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert followed their NBC late-night counterparts, Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien, in announcing that they will begin taping new shows in the new year despite the ongoing writers’ strike in Hollywood and New York City, which is crippling the entertainment industry.

As for late night comedy at CBS, the writers’ union will reportedly meet with David Letterman’s production company in an attempt to reach a separate deal that could bring back the "Late Show" to the air along with its writing staff.

"We would like to return to work with our writers," said Stewart and Colbert in a joint statement. "If we cannot, we would like to express our ambivalence, but without our writers we are unable to express something as nuanced as ambivalence."

Both The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report have been stuck in reruns since the strike began in early November, putting Comedy Central’s corporate parent, Viacom at risk for losing the big audience of one of its most successful TV franchises.

This month, negotiations between the writers and the film and TV studios have broke down, raising the prospect that the work stoppage will continue well into 2008. The absence of new scripts will get more painful for the industry as time wears on, but late-night comedy was one of the strike’s immediate casualties.

The shows of Stewart and Colbert have relied heavily on good scripts, raising questions about how they can rejuvenate their momentum without writers.

"Comedy Central forcing Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert back on the air will not give the viewers the quality shows they’ve come to expect," the Writers Guild of America West said in a statement. "The only way to get the writing staffs back on the job is for the (studios) to come back to the table prepared to negotiate a fair deal with the Writers Guild."

Shares of Viacom, which have gained ground since the strike began, recently were up 15 cents, or 0.3%, to $43.70.

<font size=1>Source: TheStreet.com/Variety</font>

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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