Nov 24, 2020
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Juno leads Canada’s Oscar charge

Except for There Will Be Blood, all of the best picture nominees had their North American premieres at the Toronto International Film Festival this year. Juno had its world premiere at the festival and was a fan favourite.

The National Film Board of Canada’s Madame Tutli-Putli, which also screened at the festival, got a nod in the best animated short category, as did I Met The Walrus, from Toronto animator Josh Raskin.

The 20-year-old Page, who still lives in Halifax in a house she shares with friends, seemed stunned to hear of her nomination when she appeared on NBC’s The Today Show early Tuesday.

“It’s extremely humbling to be recognized with these other actresses, people I respect and admire — it’s crazy,” said Page, who once had a role on the goofy Showcase hit Trailer Park Boys.

“I just feel so grateful to be part of the film and I’m so happy that people have responded to it in the way that they have.”

Page and other Canadians may not get their moment in the Hollywood spotlight, however — the ongoing screenwriters strike may very well prevent the glitzy awards ceremony from being held on Feb. 24, despite producer Gil Cates’s insistence that the show will go on with or without writers.

The stars said they would refuse to cross any picket lines set up at the Golden Globes, forcing the cancellation of the Jan. 13 televised gala — and many of them were vowing to do the same come Oscar night. That could also force the axing of an annual movie-lover’s tradition that attracts a billion viewers worldwide.

“I would never cross a picket line ever. I couldn’t,” said Tony Gilroy, a directing nominee for “Michael Clayton,” told The Associated Press.

“I’m a 20-year member of the Writers Guild. I think whatever they work out is going to be one way or the other but no, I could never cross a picket line. I think there’s a lot of people who feel that way.”

Viggo Mortensen — up for best actor for his role as a Russian mobster in David Cronenberg’s Eastern Promises — said he was hoping for the best.

“I have a feeling they’ll solve it,” he said. “I hope they do. I’m sure my mom would like to see me on TV and so forth. But if there’s a strike, I’m not crossing the line.”

In addition to Christie, Page is up against Marion Cotillard for La Vie En Rose, Cate Blanchett for Elizabeth: The Golden Age, and Laura Linney for The Savages.

Past Oscar winner Blanchett also received a supporting actress nomination for the Bob Dylan biopic I’m Not There.

Daniel Day-Lewis, an Oscar winner for My Left Foot, grabbed another best-actor nomination as a flamboyant oil baron in There Will Be Blood.

Along with Day-Lewis and Mortensen, George Clooney is nominated for Michael Clayton, Tommy Lee Jones for In The Valley of Elah, Johnny Depp for Sweeney Todd.

In the best supporting actor category, Javier Bardem is nominated for his turn as a soulless serial killer in No Country For Old Men. He’s up against Casey Affleck for The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Philip Seymour Hoffman for Charlie Wilson’s War, Hal Holbrook for Into the Wild and Tom Wilkinson for Michael Clayton.

In addition to Blanchett, other supporting actress nominees are Ruby Dee for American Gangster, Saoirse Ronan for Atonement, Amy Ryan for Gone Baby Gone and Tilda Swinton for Michael Clayton.

Notable among the nominees were those absent from the ballots. Angelina Jolie and Keira Knightley were considered shoo-ins in the best actress category, but failed to make the cut. Neither did James McAvoy, the male lead in Atonement, and the film’s director, Joe Wright. That doesn’t bode well for a best picture win for Atonement, despite its recent Golden Globe win.

In addition to Reitman, the directing nominees were Paul Thomas Anderson for There Will Be Blood, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen for No Country for Old Men, Gilroy for Michael Clayton and Julian Schnabel for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

Into The Wild, the Sean Penn film that landed on many critics’ Top 10 list last year, was snubbed, just as it was at the Golden Globes.

Michael Moore — who castigated President Bush over the Iraq War in his best-documentary acceptance speech for Bowling for Columbine in 2003 — is back in Oscar contention with his health-care documentary Sicko.

War-on-terror documentaries dominated the category, with Sicko up against No End in Sight, Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience and Taxi to the Dark Side.

In the best foreign film category, Israel’s Beaufort is facing The Counterfeiters from Austria, Poland’s Katyn, Mongol from Kazakhstan and Russia’s 12.

<font size=1>Source: Globe and Mail</font>

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Front Page, Industry News

Juno leads Canada’s Oscar charge

Except for There Will Be Blood, all of the best picture nominees had their North American premieres at the Toronto International Film Festival this year. Juno had its world premiere at the festival and was a fan favourite.

The National Film Board of Canada’s Madame Tutli-Putli, which also screened at the festival, got a nod in the best animated short category, as did I Met The Walrus, from Toronto animator Josh Raskin.

The 20-year-old Page, who still lives in Halifax in a house she shares with friends, seemed stunned to hear of her nomination when she appeared on NBC’s The Today Show early Tuesday.

“It’s extremely humbling to be recognized with these other actresses, people I respect and admire — it’s crazy,” said Page, who once had a role on the goofy Showcase hit Trailer Park Boys.

“I just feel so grateful to be part of the film and I’m so happy that people have responded to it in the way that they have.”

Page and other Canadians may not get their moment in the Hollywood spotlight, however — the ongoing screenwriters strike may very well prevent the glitzy awards ceremony from being held on Feb. 24, despite producer Gil Cates’s insistence that the show will go on with or without writers.

The stars said they would refuse to cross any picket lines set up at the Golden Globes, forcing the cancellation of the Jan. 13 televised gala — and many of them were vowing to do the same come Oscar night. That could also force the axing of an annual movie-lover’s tradition that attracts a billion viewers worldwide.

“I would never cross a picket line ever. I couldn’t,” said Tony Gilroy, a directing nominee for “Michael Clayton,” told The Associated Press.

“I’m a 20-year member of the Writers Guild. I think whatever they work out is going to be one way or the other but no, I could never cross a picket line. I think there’s a lot of people who feel that way.”

Viggo Mortensen — up for best actor for his role as a Russian mobster in David Cronenberg’s Eastern Promises — said he was hoping for the best.

“I have a feeling they’ll solve it,” he said. “I hope they do. I’m sure my mom would like to see me on TV and so forth. But if there’s a strike, I’m not crossing the line.”

In addition to Christie, Page is up against Marion Cotillard for La Vie En Rose, Cate Blanchett for Elizabeth: The Golden Age, and Laura Linney for The Savages.

Past Oscar winner Blanchett also received a supporting actress nomination for the Bob Dylan biopic I’m Not There.

Daniel Day-Lewis, an Oscar winner for My Left Foot, grabbed another best-actor nomination as a flamboyant oil baron in There Will Be Blood.

Along with Day-Lewis and Mortensen, George Clooney is nominated for Michael Clayton, Tommy Lee Jones for In The Valley of Elah, Johnny Depp for Sweeney Todd.

In the best supporting actor category, Javier Bardem is nominated for his turn as a soulless serial killer in No Country For Old Men. He’s up against Casey Affleck for The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Philip Seymour Hoffman for Charlie Wilson’s War, Hal Holbrook for Into the Wild and Tom Wilkinson for Michael Clayton.

In addition to Blanchett, other supporting actress nominees are Ruby Dee for American Gangster, Saoirse Ronan for Atonement, Amy Ryan for Gone Baby Gone and Tilda Swinton for Michael Clayton.

Notable among the nominees were those absent from the ballots. Angelina Jolie and Keira Knightley were considered shoo-ins in the best actress category, but failed to make the cut. Neither did James McAvoy, the male lead in Atonement, and the film’s director, Joe Wright. That doesn’t bode well for a best picture win for Atonement, despite its recent Golden Globe win.

In addition to Reitman, the directing nominees were Paul Thomas Anderson for There Will Be Blood, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen for No Country for Old Men, Gilroy for Michael Clayton and Julian Schnabel for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

Into The Wild, the Sean Penn film that landed on many critics’ Top 10 list last year, was snubbed, just as it was at the Golden Globes.

Michael Moore — who castigated President Bush over the Iraq War in his best-documentary acceptance speech for Bowling for Columbine in 2003 — is back in Oscar contention with his health-care documentary Sicko.

War-on-terror documentaries dominated the category, with Sicko up against No End in Sight, Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience and Taxi to the Dark Side.

In the best foreign film category, Israel’s Beaufort is facing The Counterfeiters from Austria, Poland’s Katyn, Mongol from Kazakhstan and Russia’s 12.

<font size=1>Source: Globe and Mail</font>

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Juno leads Canada’s Oscar charge

Except for There Will Be Blood, all of the best picture nominees had their North American premieres at the Toronto International Film Festival this year. Juno had its world premiere at the festival and was a fan favourite.

The National Film Board of Canada’s Madame Tutli-Putli, which also screened at the festival, got a nod in the best animated short category, as did I Met The Walrus, from Toronto animator Josh Raskin.

The 20-year-old Page, who still lives in Halifax in a house she shares with friends, seemed stunned to hear of her nomination when she appeared on NBC’s The Today Show early Tuesday.

“It’s extremely humbling to be recognized with these other actresses, people I respect and admire — it’s crazy,” said Page, who once had a role on the goofy Showcase hit Trailer Park Boys.

“I just feel so grateful to be part of the film and I’m so happy that people have responded to it in the way that they have.”

Page and other Canadians may not get their moment in the Hollywood spotlight, however — the ongoing screenwriters strike may very well prevent the glitzy awards ceremony from being held on Feb. 24, despite producer Gil Cates’s insistence that the show will go on with or without writers.

The stars said they would refuse to cross any picket lines set up at the Golden Globes, forcing the cancellation of the Jan. 13 televised gala — and many of them were vowing to do the same come Oscar night. That could also force the axing of an annual movie-lover’s tradition that attracts a billion viewers worldwide.

“I would never cross a picket line ever. I couldn’t,” said Tony Gilroy, a directing nominee for “Michael Clayton,” told The Associated Press.

“I’m a 20-year member of the Writers Guild. I think whatever they work out is going to be one way or the other but no, I could never cross a picket line. I think there’s a lot of people who feel that way.”

Viggo Mortensen — up for best actor for his role as a Russian mobster in David Cronenberg’s Eastern Promises — said he was hoping for the best.

“I have a feeling they’ll solve it,” he said. “I hope they do. I’m sure my mom would like to see me on TV and so forth. But if there’s a strike, I’m not crossing the line.”

In addition to Christie, Page is up against Marion Cotillard for La Vie En Rose, Cate Blanchett for Elizabeth: The Golden Age, and Laura Linney for The Savages.

Past Oscar winner Blanchett also received a supporting actress nomination for the Bob Dylan biopic I’m Not There.

Daniel Day-Lewis, an Oscar winner for My Left Foot, grabbed another best-actor nomination as a flamboyant oil baron in There Will Be Blood.

Along with Day-Lewis and Mortensen, George Clooney is nominated for Michael Clayton, Tommy Lee Jones for In The Valley of Elah, Johnny Depp for Sweeney Todd.

In the best supporting actor category, Javier Bardem is nominated for his turn as a soulless serial killer in No Country For Old Men. He’s up against Casey Affleck for The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Philip Seymour Hoffman for Charlie Wilson’s War, Hal Holbrook for Into the Wild and Tom Wilkinson for Michael Clayton.

In addition to Blanchett, other supporting actress nominees are Ruby Dee for American Gangster, Saoirse Ronan for Atonement, Amy Ryan for Gone Baby Gone and Tilda Swinton for Michael Clayton.

Notable among the nominees were those absent from the ballots. Angelina Jolie and Keira Knightley were considered shoo-ins in the best actress category, but failed to make the cut. Neither did James McAvoy, the male lead in Atonement, and the film’s director, Joe Wright. That doesn’t bode well for a best picture win for Atonement, despite its recent Golden Globe win.

In addition to Reitman, the directing nominees were Paul Thomas Anderson for There Will Be Blood, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen for No Country for Old Men, Gilroy for Michael Clayton and Julian Schnabel for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

Into The Wild, the Sean Penn film that landed on many critics’ Top 10 list last year, was snubbed, just as it was at the Golden Globes.

Michael Moore — who castigated President Bush over the Iraq War in his best-documentary acceptance speech for Bowling for Columbine in 2003 — is back in Oscar contention with his health-care documentary Sicko.

War-on-terror documentaries dominated the category, with Sicko up against No End in Sight, Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience and Taxi to the Dark Side.

In the best foreign film category, Israel’s Beaufort is facing The Counterfeiters from Austria, Poland’s Katyn, Mongol from Kazakhstan and Russia’s 12.

<font size=1>Source: Globe and Mail</font>

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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