Oct 23, 2021
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Front Page, Industry News

Iceland volcano affects film premieres

LONDON — The London world premiere of “Iron Man 2,” planned for April 26, and Tuesday’s European charity premiere of Julie Anne Robinson’s “The Last Song” are the first major movie events to be grounded by the volcanic dust cloud that has shut down airspace across continental Europe.

Paramount and Marvel announced late Monday that the world premiere of “Iron Man 2” will be rescheduled to happen in Los Angeles instead of a star-studded London lineup with the film’s stars Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Scarlett Johansson, Mickey Rourke, Samuel L. Jackson and director Jon Favreau.

“Due to the continuing air travel uncertainty, Paramount Pictures and Marvel Entertainment have taken the decision to move the ‘Iron Man 2’ world premiere and junket to Los Angeles,” the companies said.

“A press release will be in issued in due course advising details of this event and confirming talent attendance. Advanced discussions are in progress about a special screening at the Vue Westfield, the original venue for the world premiere on April 26.”

International distribution of the movie seems to be unaffected.

“Luckily, we had the copies of ‘Iron Man 2’ delivered a week ago, just before the volcano erupted,” said an employee at German distributor Concorde, which will be bowing the Marvel actioner next month. “If they had been delayed, it would have been tight getting the film dubbed and mixed for the May 6 release.”

“The Last Song” also will be left with some premium empty seats as the movie’s director and stars Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth are unable to get to the event at the Empire Leicester Square to promote the movie. Disney and Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity have both said the event, scheduled for Tuesday, will go ahead with the whistles, without some of the bells.

If the Icelandic ash continues to keep European planes grounded, the widespread use of digital distribution technology means that majors will be better shielded from any ill effects. An increasing proportion of copies for Hollywood tentpoles are now delivered digitally to cinemas via satellite, making air traffic regulations irrelevant. And virtually every major studio uses Smartjog or a similar digital delivery system to provide its international outlets with press and marketing material.

“We had some sound material scheduled to be sent on DVD by Fed-Ex that was held up,” said Alexandra Meister of Germany’s Senator Film. “But we were able to switch over to an FTP server for that. There haven’t been any major problems so far.”

Europe’s big TV players are adopting a wait-and-see approach to the mounting confusion arising from the cloud of volcanic ash still hovering over the continent five days after European airspace was shut down, with a slew of companies including NBC Universal, Fremantle, Disney, Zodiak Television and Endemol maintaining that they were monitoring the situation.

Last week, companies struggled to deal with the immediate fallout of canceled flights and get home the hundreds of execs who faced extreme disruption to travel plans on their way back from the Riviera-side MIPTV market.

But there are now hopes that the situation will resolve itself so that air travel can return to normal.

With some airports in Spain and southern Europe opening up after five days of closure, there is optimism that at least some flights will be back up in the air, enabling trapped executives heading for home to get onboard transatlantic flights.

But the longer term situation remains far from clear, potentially affecting events like the Festival de Cannes and the L.A. Screenings, due to roll out in the next month.

And the latest news that an undisclosed number of NATO F-16 and F-18 fighter planes suffered engine damage after flying through the atmospheric dust haze will further complicate matters, despite the eagerness of airlines to cut their losses and get their fleets off the ground.

Sports fixtures are also likely to be thrown into doubt, with next week’s London Marathon likely to be affected as hundreds of elite competitors who expected to fly into the U.K. face uncertainty over their travel plans.

While several big time events, such as UEFA’s Champions’ League soccer semi-finals, are going ahead as planned, with teams taking the coach between European conurbations, the air space above the major U.K. airports remains mostly closed and transatlantic travel is out.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

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Front Page, Industry News

Iceland volcano affects film premieres

LONDON — The London world premiere of “Iron Man 2,” planned for April 26, and Tuesday’s European charity premiere of Julie Anne Robinson’s “The Last Song” are the first major movie events to be grounded by the volcanic dust cloud that has shut down airspace across continental Europe.

Paramount and Marvel announced late Monday that the world premiere of “Iron Man 2” will be rescheduled to happen in Los Angeles instead of a star-studded London lineup with the film’s stars Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Scarlett Johansson, Mickey Rourke, Samuel L. Jackson and director Jon Favreau.

“Due to the continuing air travel uncertainty, Paramount Pictures and Marvel Entertainment have taken the decision to move the ‘Iron Man 2’ world premiere and junket to Los Angeles,” the companies said.

“A press release will be in issued in due course advising details of this event and confirming talent attendance. Advanced discussions are in progress about a special screening at the Vue Westfield, the original venue for the world premiere on April 26.”

International distribution of the movie seems to be unaffected.

“Luckily, we had the copies of ‘Iron Man 2’ delivered a week ago, just before the volcano erupted,” said an employee at German distributor Concorde, which will be bowing the Marvel actioner next month. “If they had been delayed, it would have been tight getting the film dubbed and mixed for the May 6 release.”

“The Last Song” also will be left with some premium empty seats as the movie’s director and stars Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth are unable to get to the event at the Empire Leicester Square to promote the movie. Disney and Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity have both said the event, scheduled for Tuesday, will go ahead with the whistles, without some of the bells.

If the Icelandic ash continues to keep European planes grounded, the widespread use of digital distribution technology means that majors will be better shielded from any ill effects. An increasing proportion of copies for Hollywood tentpoles are now delivered digitally to cinemas via satellite, making air traffic regulations irrelevant. And virtually every major studio uses Smartjog or a similar digital delivery system to provide its international outlets with press and marketing material.

“We had some sound material scheduled to be sent on DVD by Fed-Ex that was held up,” said Alexandra Meister of Germany’s Senator Film. “But we were able to switch over to an FTP server for that. There haven’t been any major problems so far.”

Europe’s big TV players are adopting a wait-and-see approach to the mounting confusion arising from the cloud of volcanic ash still hovering over the continent five days after European airspace was shut down, with a slew of companies including NBC Universal, Fremantle, Disney, Zodiak Television and Endemol maintaining that they were monitoring the situation.

Last week, companies struggled to deal with the immediate fallout of canceled flights and get home the hundreds of execs who faced extreme disruption to travel plans on their way back from the Riviera-side MIPTV market.

But there are now hopes that the situation will resolve itself so that air travel can return to normal.

With some airports in Spain and southern Europe opening up after five days of closure, there is optimism that at least some flights will be back up in the air, enabling trapped executives heading for home to get onboard transatlantic flights.

But the longer term situation remains far from clear, potentially affecting events like the Festival de Cannes and the L.A. Screenings, due to roll out in the next month.

And the latest news that an undisclosed number of NATO F-16 and F-18 fighter planes suffered engine damage after flying through the atmospheric dust haze will further complicate matters, despite the eagerness of airlines to cut their losses and get their fleets off the ground.

Sports fixtures are also likely to be thrown into doubt, with next week’s London Marathon likely to be affected as hundreds of elite competitors who expected to fly into the U.K. face uncertainty over their travel plans.

While several big time events, such as UEFA’s Champions’ League soccer semi-finals, are going ahead as planned, with teams taking the coach between European conurbations, the air space above the major U.K. airports remains mostly closed and transatlantic travel is out.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Iceland volcano affects film premieres

LONDON — The London world premiere of “Iron Man 2,” planned for April 26, and Tuesday’s European charity premiere of Julie Anne Robinson’s “The Last Song” are the first major movie events to be grounded by the volcanic dust cloud that has shut down airspace across continental Europe.

Paramount and Marvel announced late Monday that the world premiere of “Iron Man 2” will be rescheduled to happen in Los Angeles instead of a star-studded London lineup with the film’s stars Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Scarlett Johansson, Mickey Rourke, Samuel L. Jackson and director Jon Favreau.

“Due to the continuing air travel uncertainty, Paramount Pictures and Marvel Entertainment have taken the decision to move the ‘Iron Man 2’ world premiere and junket to Los Angeles,” the companies said.

“A press release will be in issued in due course advising details of this event and confirming talent attendance. Advanced discussions are in progress about a special screening at the Vue Westfield, the original venue for the world premiere on April 26.”

International distribution of the movie seems to be unaffected.

“Luckily, we had the copies of ‘Iron Man 2’ delivered a week ago, just before the volcano erupted,” said an employee at German distributor Concorde, which will be bowing the Marvel actioner next month. “If they had been delayed, it would have been tight getting the film dubbed and mixed for the May 6 release.”

“The Last Song” also will be left with some premium empty seats as the movie’s director and stars Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth are unable to get to the event at the Empire Leicester Square to promote the movie. Disney and Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity have both said the event, scheduled for Tuesday, will go ahead with the whistles, without some of the bells.

If the Icelandic ash continues to keep European planes grounded, the widespread use of digital distribution technology means that majors will be better shielded from any ill effects. An increasing proportion of copies for Hollywood tentpoles are now delivered digitally to cinemas via satellite, making air traffic regulations irrelevant. And virtually every major studio uses Smartjog or a similar digital delivery system to provide its international outlets with press and marketing material.

“We had some sound material scheduled to be sent on DVD by Fed-Ex that was held up,” said Alexandra Meister of Germany’s Senator Film. “But we were able to switch over to an FTP server for that. There haven’t been any major problems so far.”

Europe’s big TV players are adopting a wait-and-see approach to the mounting confusion arising from the cloud of volcanic ash still hovering over the continent five days after European airspace was shut down, with a slew of companies including NBC Universal, Fremantle, Disney, Zodiak Television and Endemol maintaining that they were monitoring the situation.

Last week, companies struggled to deal with the immediate fallout of canceled flights and get home the hundreds of execs who faced extreme disruption to travel plans on their way back from the Riviera-side MIPTV market.

But there are now hopes that the situation will resolve itself so that air travel can return to normal.

With some airports in Spain and southern Europe opening up after five days of closure, there is optimism that at least some flights will be back up in the air, enabling trapped executives heading for home to get onboard transatlantic flights.

But the longer term situation remains far from clear, potentially affecting events like the Festival de Cannes and the L.A. Screenings, due to roll out in the next month.

And the latest news that an undisclosed number of NATO F-16 and F-18 fighter planes suffered engine damage after flying through the atmospheric dust haze will further complicate matters, despite the eagerness of airlines to cut their losses and get their fleets off the ground.

Sports fixtures are also likely to be thrown into doubt, with next week’s London Marathon likely to be affected as hundreds of elite competitors who expected to fly into the U.K. face uncertainty over their travel plans.

While several big time events, such as UEFA’s Champions’ League soccer semi-finals, are going ahead as planned, with teams taking the coach between European conurbations, the air space above the major U.K. airports remains mostly closed and transatlantic travel is out.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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