Oct 22, 2019
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Canadian filmmakers make the cut at Sundance

VANCOUVER - Margaret Atwood’s prescient tales of debt, Chinese pugilists and videogame developers will headline Canada’s presence at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

The Park City fandango founded by Robert Redford announced the films in competition Wednesday, and though no Canadian reels were accepted in the narrative category, three documentaries from the Great White North will compete in the World Cinema non-fiction race.

The highest profile effort is Payback, the adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s book and series of Massey Lectures from veteran director Jennifer Baichwal (Manufactured Landscapes, Act of God). Payback doesn’t just follow Atwood around on tour, it gets deep into the layers of her research-heavy book to cast new light on our current economy.

Payback is a National Film Board production, and marks Baichwal’s third appearance in Park City.

Indie Game: The Movie brings the drama of videogame production to the big screen for an almost epic look at the ups and downs of stumping code strings for a living. Winnipeg directors James Swirsky and Lisanne Pajot make their first Utah trek with the emotionally focused reel.

The last Canadian contender is China Heavyweight. A story about kids looking for their big break in the ring, the film is the second feature from Chang Yung, who directed Up the Yangtze in 2007.

With the biggest population sample to pick from, Chinese coaches recruit the biggest kids from the poorest areas to train as fighters for profit. The film asks whether the kids are getting a real break, or simply being exploited.

“We are, and always have been, a festival about the filmmakers. So what are they doing? What are they saying?” says Robert Redford. “They are making statements about the changing world we are living in. Some are straight-forward, some novel and some offbeat but always interesting. One can never predict. We know only at the end, and I love that.”

The Sundance Film Festival takes place January 19-29 in Park City, Utah.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Front Page, Industry News

Canadian filmmakers make the cut at Sundance

VANCOUVER - Margaret Atwood’s prescient tales of debt, Chinese pugilists and videogame developers will headline Canada’s presence at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

The Park City fandango founded by Robert Redford announced the films in competition Wednesday, and though no Canadian reels were accepted in the narrative category, three documentaries from the Great White North will compete in the World Cinema non-fiction race.

The highest profile effort is Payback, the adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s book and series of Massey Lectures from veteran director Jennifer Baichwal (Manufactured Landscapes, Act of God). Payback doesn’t just follow Atwood around on tour, it gets deep into the layers of her research-heavy book to cast new light on our current economy.

Payback is a National Film Board production, and marks Baichwal’s third appearance in Park City.

Indie Game: The Movie brings the drama of videogame production to the big screen for an almost epic look at the ups and downs of stumping code strings for a living. Winnipeg directors James Swirsky and Lisanne Pajot make their first Utah trek with the emotionally focused reel.

The last Canadian contender is China Heavyweight. A story about kids looking for their big break in the ring, the film is the second feature from Chang Yung, who directed Up the Yangtze in 2007.

With the biggest population sample to pick from, Chinese coaches recruit the biggest kids from the poorest areas to train as fighters for profit. The film asks whether the kids are getting a real break, or simply being exploited.

“We are, and always have been, a festival about the filmmakers. So what are they doing? What are they saying?” says Robert Redford. “They are making statements about the changing world we are living in. Some are straight-forward, some novel and some offbeat but always interesting. One can never predict. We know only at the end, and I love that.”

The Sundance Film Festival takes place January 19-29 in Park City, Utah.

Source: Vancouver Sun

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Canadian filmmakers make the cut at Sundance

VANCOUVER - Margaret Atwood’s prescient tales of debt, Chinese pugilists and videogame developers will headline Canada’s presence at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

The Park City fandango founded by Robert Redford announced the films in competition Wednesday, and though no Canadian reels were accepted in the narrative category, three documentaries from the Great White North will compete in the World Cinema non-fiction race.

The highest profile effort is Payback, the adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s book and series of Massey Lectures from veteran director Jennifer Baichwal (Manufactured Landscapes, Act of God). Payback doesn’t just follow Atwood around on tour, it gets deep into the layers of her research-heavy book to cast new light on our current economy.

Payback is a National Film Board production, and marks Baichwal’s third appearance in Park City.

Indie Game: The Movie brings the drama of videogame production to the big screen for an almost epic look at the ups and downs of stumping code strings for a living. Winnipeg directors James Swirsky and Lisanne Pajot make their first Utah trek with the emotionally focused reel.

The last Canadian contender is China Heavyweight. A story about kids looking for their big break in the ring, the film is the second feature from Chang Yung, who directed Up the Yangtze in 2007.

With the biggest population sample to pick from, Chinese coaches recruit the biggest kids from the poorest areas to train as fighters for profit. The film asks whether the kids are getting a real break, or simply being exploited.

“We are, and always have been, a festival about the filmmakers. So what are they doing? What are they saying?” says Robert Redford. “They are making statements about the changing world we are living in. Some are straight-forward, some novel and some offbeat but always interesting. One can never predict. We know only at the end, and I love that.”

The Sundance Film Festival takes place January 19-29 in Park City, Utah.

Source: Vancouver Sun

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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