Oct 21, 2019
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Front Page, Industry News

Co-Production Plan Boosts Canada’s TV, Film and Second Screen Industries

The Department of Canadian Heritage will continue to negotiate co-production treaties on behalf of the country’s film, television and second screen content producers.

In the past ten years, such negotiations have led to some 700 co pros valued at nearly $5 billion in total production budgets.

James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, Paul Calandra, Parliamentary Secretary and Member of Parliament (Oak Ridges-Markham), announced the implementation of Canada’s policy on co-productions in a speech to the Canadian Media Production Association Prime Time in Ottawa conference last week.

In a related announcement at Prime Time, the Canada Media Fund released a white paper that highlights the various benefits that can be generated for producers and broadcasters by second screen initiatives.

The 20-page Second Screen and Television – Benefits and Impacts report, prepared by Evolumedia Group, co-published with the Canada Media Fund (CMF) and funded by the Societe de développement des entreprises culturelles (SODEC), is available as a PDF download in English and French on the CMF and Evolumedia websites.

Noting several recent examples, the report specifically looks at the benefits of second screen strategies related to television programs in terms of discovery, loyalty building and monetization.

The new co-productions policy is designed to deepen Canada’s audio-visual production partnerships with markets around the world, with the continuation of co-production negotiations with foreign partners that is designed to make it easier for Canada and partners to get co-production projects off the ground with simplified administrative processes and increased flexibility on agreements.

The international co-production environment has seen some significant changes in recent years due to economic and international factors, technological advances, and greater global competition for investment, the Government described in a backgrounder to its policy.

In light of these changes, in 2011 the Government of Canada announced Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction and launched an online consultation to hear the views of Canadians, members of the industry, and other stakeholders.

The implementation of Canada’s Policy on Co productions is the next step in paving the way for future coproduction negotiations between Canada and its foreign partners. This policy will focus Canada’s approach to co productions and ensure that Canadians and the film and television production industry achieve the maximum benefit from government actions.

Under the auspices of a treaty coproduction, Canadian and foreign producers are able to pool their creative, technical, and financial resources to coproduce audiovisual projects. Such co productions are granted domestic status in their respective countries and, as such, they can access domestic funding programs, fiscal incentives, and broadcast quotas, if eligible. In Canada, available support mechanisms include the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC), the Canada Media Fund, and the Canada Feature Film Fund, as well as programs and fiscal incentives from the provinces and territories.

As the designated Competent Authority, the Department of Canadian Heritage is responsible for negotiating coproduction treaties. As the Administrative Authority, Telefilm Canada is responsible for the administrative aspects. Telefilm Canada receives and evaluates applications for treaty coproduction certification and makes recommendations to the Minister of Canadian Heritage through the Canadian Audiovisual Certification Office (CAVCO).

Canada signed its first coproduction treaty with France in 1963. Today it has treaties with 53 foreign partners and is recognized as a world leader in audiovisual treaty coproduction. .

Over the past decade, Canada has coproduced close to more than 700 film and television co productions valued at more than $4.9 billion in total production budgets. Some of these treaty co productions include recent feature films such as Barney’s Version (Canada-Italy), Resident Evil: Retribution (Canada-Germany), Inch’Allah (Canada-France), Laurence Anyways (Canada-France), and Mama (Canada-Spain), as well as television productions such as The Tudors (Canada-Ireland), The Borgias (Canada-Hungary-Ireland), and Babar (Canada-France).

Source: Mediacaster

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Front Page, Industry News

Co-Production Plan Boosts Canada’s TV, Film and Second Screen Industries

The Department of Canadian Heritage will continue to negotiate co-production treaties on behalf of the country’s film, television and second screen content producers.

In the past ten years, such negotiations have led to some 700 co pros valued at nearly $5 billion in total production budgets.

James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, Paul Calandra, Parliamentary Secretary and Member of Parliament (Oak Ridges-Markham), announced the implementation of Canada’s policy on co-productions in a speech to the Canadian Media Production Association Prime Time in Ottawa conference last week.

In a related announcement at Prime Time, the Canada Media Fund released a white paper that highlights the various benefits that can be generated for producers and broadcasters by second screen initiatives.

The 20-page Second Screen and Television – Benefits and Impacts report, prepared by Evolumedia Group, co-published with the Canada Media Fund (CMF) and funded by the Societe de développement des entreprises culturelles (SODEC), is available as a PDF download in English and French on the CMF and Evolumedia websites.

Noting several recent examples, the report specifically looks at the benefits of second screen strategies related to television programs in terms of discovery, loyalty building and monetization.

The new co-productions policy is designed to deepen Canada’s audio-visual production partnerships with markets around the world, with the continuation of co-production negotiations with foreign partners that is designed to make it easier for Canada and partners to get co-production projects off the ground with simplified administrative processes and increased flexibility on agreements.

The international co-production environment has seen some significant changes in recent years due to economic and international factors, technological advances, and greater global competition for investment, the Government described in a backgrounder to its policy.

In light of these changes, in 2011 the Government of Canada announced Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction and launched an online consultation to hear the views of Canadians, members of the industry, and other stakeholders.

The implementation of Canada’s Policy on Co productions is the next step in paving the way for future coproduction negotiations between Canada and its foreign partners. This policy will focus Canada’s approach to co productions and ensure that Canadians and the film and television production industry achieve the maximum benefit from government actions.

Under the auspices of a treaty coproduction, Canadian and foreign producers are able to pool their creative, technical, and financial resources to coproduce audiovisual projects. Such co productions are granted domestic status in their respective countries and, as such, they can access domestic funding programs, fiscal incentives, and broadcast quotas, if eligible. In Canada, available support mechanisms include the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC), the Canada Media Fund, and the Canada Feature Film Fund, as well as programs and fiscal incentives from the provinces and territories.

As the designated Competent Authority, the Department of Canadian Heritage is responsible for negotiating coproduction treaties. As the Administrative Authority, Telefilm Canada is responsible for the administrative aspects. Telefilm Canada receives and evaluates applications for treaty coproduction certification and makes recommendations to the Minister of Canadian Heritage through the Canadian Audiovisual Certification Office (CAVCO).

Canada signed its first coproduction treaty with France in 1963. Today it has treaties with 53 foreign partners and is recognized as a world leader in audiovisual treaty coproduction. .

Over the past decade, Canada has coproduced close to more than 700 film and television co productions valued at more than $4.9 billion in total production budgets. Some of these treaty co productions include recent feature films such as Barney’s Version (Canada-Italy), Resident Evil: Retribution (Canada-Germany), Inch’Allah (Canada-France), Laurence Anyways (Canada-France), and Mama (Canada-Spain), as well as television productions such as The Tudors (Canada-Ireland), The Borgias (Canada-Hungary-Ireland), and Babar (Canada-France).

Source: Mediacaster

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Co-Production Plan Boosts Canada’s TV, Film and Second Screen Industries

The Department of Canadian Heritage will continue to negotiate co-production treaties on behalf of the country’s film, television and second screen content producers.

In the past ten years, such negotiations have led to some 700 co pros valued at nearly $5 billion in total production budgets.

James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, Paul Calandra, Parliamentary Secretary and Member of Parliament (Oak Ridges-Markham), announced the implementation of Canada’s policy on co-productions in a speech to the Canadian Media Production Association Prime Time in Ottawa conference last week.

In a related announcement at Prime Time, the Canada Media Fund released a white paper that highlights the various benefits that can be generated for producers and broadcasters by second screen initiatives.

The 20-page Second Screen and Television – Benefits and Impacts report, prepared by Evolumedia Group, co-published with the Canada Media Fund (CMF) and funded by the Societe de développement des entreprises culturelles (SODEC), is available as a PDF download in English and French on the CMF and Evolumedia websites.

Noting several recent examples, the report specifically looks at the benefits of second screen strategies related to television programs in terms of discovery, loyalty building and monetization.

The new co-productions policy is designed to deepen Canada’s audio-visual production partnerships with markets around the world, with the continuation of co-production negotiations with foreign partners that is designed to make it easier for Canada and partners to get co-production projects off the ground with simplified administrative processes and increased flexibility on agreements.

The international co-production environment has seen some significant changes in recent years due to economic and international factors, technological advances, and greater global competition for investment, the Government described in a backgrounder to its policy.

In light of these changes, in 2011 the Government of Canada announced Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction and launched an online consultation to hear the views of Canadians, members of the industry, and other stakeholders.

The implementation of Canada’s Policy on Co productions is the next step in paving the way for future coproduction negotiations between Canada and its foreign partners. This policy will focus Canada’s approach to co productions and ensure that Canadians and the film and television production industry achieve the maximum benefit from government actions.

Under the auspices of a treaty coproduction, Canadian and foreign producers are able to pool their creative, technical, and financial resources to coproduce audiovisual projects. Such co productions are granted domestic status in their respective countries and, as such, they can access domestic funding programs, fiscal incentives, and broadcast quotas, if eligible. In Canada, available support mechanisms include the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC), the Canada Media Fund, and the Canada Feature Film Fund, as well as programs and fiscal incentives from the provinces and territories.

As the designated Competent Authority, the Department of Canadian Heritage is responsible for negotiating coproduction treaties. As the Administrative Authority, Telefilm Canada is responsible for the administrative aspects. Telefilm Canada receives and evaluates applications for treaty coproduction certification and makes recommendations to the Minister of Canadian Heritage through the Canadian Audiovisual Certification Office (CAVCO).

Canada signed its first coproduction treaty with France in 1963. Today it has treaties with 53 foreign partners and is recognized as a world leader in audiovisual treaty coproduction. .

Over the past decade, Canada has coproduced close to more than 700 film and television co productions valued at more than $4.9 billion in total production budgets. Some of these treaty co productions include recent feature films such as Barney’s Version (Canada-Italy), Resident Evil: Retribution (Canada-Germany), Inch’Allah (Canada-France), Laurence Anyways (Canada-France), and Mama (Canada-Spain), as well as television productions such as The Tudors (Canada-Ireland), The Borgias (Canada-Hungary-Ireland), and Babar (Canada-France).

Source: Mediacaster

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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