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Film review: Bad Milo!

By TO411 staff writer
Daisy Maclean

Bad Milo! can really only be described as a violating experience. It has some of the most awkward, cringeworthy scenes and yet it’s so well written, such a gem-like gathering of comedic talent, that you cannot stop watching. And so you sit there horrified, entertained, feet held to the flames shouting things at the screen like, “Oh! Dude.” because it’s too good to look away. This is not your parents’ horror rom-com. If you missed this film’s screening at Fantasia or The Toronto After Dark Festival then you are in luck because it’s out on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD in Canada as of January 21, 2014.

Let me first explain that this is not a movie to watch while eating dinner, and I would suggest you keep the snacks neutral: no refried beans or ground beef. Bad Milo!, written by Benjamin Hayes and Jacob Vaughan, is about a man whose inability to deal with stress triggers a gastrointestinal reaction of epic proportions. Yes folks, poop jokes as far as the eye can see.

Out of medical options and teetering on the edge, Duncan turns to the help of a hypnotherapist who discovers that this is all being caused by a demon living in his intestine. When Duncan’s anxiety hits critical mass, the demon forces its way out and slaughters those responsible for his stress. The hypnotherapist just so happens to have an ancient book on ass demons and encourages Duncan to bond with it, because as you know, anything you do to your ass demon you do to yourself. Out of fear for his loved ones, Duncan names it Milo and finds himself reasoning with it to keep its seemingly insatiable appetite at bay.

Now this film is full of hey-its-that-guy-from-that-thing actors, so let me save you some IMDB time: the first person you’ll recognize is Gillian Jacobs, who plays Britta on Community. This girl has talent coming out of her ears; twice in this movie she conveys everything about a scene brilliantly without any lines. Ken Marino, who plays the lead, Duncan, has made appearances on a lot of big shows, but we recognized him from Angel and Reaper. Peter Stormare, who we loved in The Big Lebowski and Fargo, is the hypnotherapist. Patrick Warbuton is Duncan’s boss, he is mainly recognizable from Rules of Engagement but he has done voice work on almost every cartoon show ever. The movie’s most awkward dinner conversation is lead by Duncan’s sexually experimental mother, played by Mary Kay Place who’s been in Big Love, The West Wing, and My So Called Life.

There is one let down scene in the movie where the production opted for digital blood instead of practical but most of the movie is deliciously grotesque in its attention to detail. The Demon itself is a kind of an E.T./Dinosaurs baby crossbreed with more than a hint of Critters. Its proportions when compared to the size of the actor do leave the mind reeling a bit. This film is definitely not for everyone, however there is no other movie that will prompt you to laugh:

‘Now, that is the look of a man about to unleash an ass demon.’

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Front Page, Industry News

Film review: Bad Milo!

By TO411 staff writer
Daisy Maclean

Bad Milo! can really only be described as a violating experience. It has some of the most awkward, cringeworthy scenes and yet it’s so well written, such a gem-like gathering of comedic talent, that you cannot stop watching. And so you sit there horrified, entertained, feet held to the flames shouting things at the screen like, “Oh! Dude.” because it’s too good to look away. This is not your parents’ horror rom-com. If you missed this film’s screening at Fantasia or The Toronto After Dark Festival then you are in luck because it’s out on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD in Canada as of January 21, 2014.

Let me first explain that this is not a movie to watch while eating dinner, and I would suggest you keep the snacks neutral: no refried beans or ground beef. Bad Milo!, written by Benjamin Hayes and Jacob Vaughan, is about a man whose inability to deal with stress triggers a gastrointestinal reaction of epic proportions. Yes folks, poop jokes as far as the eye can see.

Out of medical options and teetering on the edge, Duncan turns to the help of a hypnotherapist who discovers that this is all being caused by a demon living in his intestine. When Duncan’s anxiety hits critical mass, the demon forces its way out and slaughters those responsible for his stress. The hypnotherapist just so happens to have an ancient book on ass demons and encourages Duncan to bond with it, because as you know, anything you do to your ass demon you do to yourself. Out of fear for his loved ones, Duncan names it Milo and finds himself reasoning with it to keep its seemingly insatiable appetite at bay.

Now this film is full of hey-its-that-guy-from-that-thing actors, so let me save you some IMDB time: the first person you’ll recognize is Gillian Jacobs, who plays Britta on Community. This girl has talent coming out of her ears; twice in this movie she conveys everything about a scene brilliantly without any lines. Ken Marino, who plays the lead, Duncan, has made appearances on a lot of big shows, but we recognized him from Angel and Reaper. Peter Stormare, who we loved in The Big Lebowski and Fargo, is the hypnotherapist. Patrick Warbuton is Duncan’s boss, he is mainly recognizable from Rules of Engagement but he has done voice work on almost every cartoon show ever. The movie’s most awkward dinner conversation is lead by Duncan’s sexually experimental mother, played by Mary Kay Place who’s been in Big Love, The West Wing, and My So Called Life.

There is one let down scene in the movie where the production opted for digital blood instead of practical but most of the movie is deliciously grotesque in its attention to detail. The Demon itself is a kind of an E.T./Dinosaurs baby crossbreed with more than a hint of Critters. Its proportions when compared to the size of the actor do leave the mind reeling a bit. This film is definitely not for everyone, however there is no other movie that will prompt you to laugh:

‘Now, that is the look of a man about to unleash an ass demon.’

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Film review: Bad Milo!

By TO411 staff writer
Daisy Maclean

Bad Milo! can really only be described as a violating experience. It has some of the most awkward, cringeworthy scenes and yet it’s so well written, such a gem-like gathering of comedic talent, that you cannot stop watching. And so you sit there horrified, entertained, feet held to the flames shouting things at the screen like, “Oh! Dude.” because it’s too good to look away. This is not your parents’ horror rom-com. If you missed this film’s screening at Fantasia or The Toronto After Dark Festival then you are in luck because it’s out on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD in Canada as of January 21, 2014.

Let me first explain that this is not a movie to watch while eating dinner, and I would suggest you keep the snacks neutral: no refried beans or ground beef. Bad Milo!, written by Benjamin Hayes and Jacob Vaughan, is about a man whose inability to deal with stress triggers a gastrointestinal reaction of epic proportions. Yes folks, poop jokes as far as the eye can see.

Out of medical options and teetering on the edge, Duncan turns to the help of a hypnotherapist who discovers that this is all being caused by a demon living in his intestine. When Duncan’s anxiety hits critical mass, the demon forces its way out and slaughters those responsible for his stress. The hypnotherapist just so happens to have an ancient book on ass demons and encourages Duncan to bond with it, because as you know, anything you do to your ass demon you do to yourself. Out of fear for his loved ones, Duncan names it Milo and finds himself reasoning with it to keep its seemingly insatiable appetite at bay.

Now this film is full of hey-its-that-guy-from-that-thing actors, so let me save you some IMDB time: the first person you’ll recognize is Gillian Jacobs, who plays Britta on Community. This girl has talent coming out of her ears; twice in this movie she conveys everything about a scene brilliantly without any lines. Ken Marino, who plays the lead, Duncan, has made appearances on a lot of big shows, but we recognized him from Angel and Reaper. Peter Stormare, who we loved in The Big Lebowski and Fargo, is the hypnotherapist. Patrick Warbuton is Duncan’s boss, he is mainly recognizable from Rules of Engagement but he has done voice work on almost every cartoon show ever. The movie’s most awkward dinner conversation is lead by Duncan’s sexually experimental mother, played by Mary Kay Place who’s been in Big Love, The West Wing, and My So Called Life.

There is one let down scene in the movie where the production opted for digital blood instead of practical but most of the movie is deliciously grotesque in its attention to detail. The Demon itself is a kind of an E.T./Dinosaurs baby crossbreed with more than a hint of Critters. Its proportions when compared to the size of the actor do leave the mind reeling a bit. This film is definitely not for everyone, however there is no other movie that will prompt you to laugh:

‘Now, that is the look of a man about to unleash an ass demon.’

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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