Nov 23, 2020
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ACTRA days away from strike

TORONTO (CP) _ The union representing 21,000 film, television and radio workers across Canada said early Thursday a major labour disruption could be a few days away.

Talks between the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists, or ACTRA, and the producers’ organization broke down late Wednesday, said Stephen Waddell, the organization’s national executive director and chief negotiator.

"I very much regret that Canadian producers have decided to provoke a dispute in which they will be the principal victims," Waddell said.

"But given the conduct of their trade associations, we appear to be a few days away from a major disruption in Canada’s film and television industry."

ACTRA is in a legal strike position as of January 1, 2007 in most of Canada.

No new negotiations are scheduled.

The union’s main contentions centre around wage increases and the use of performances on the internet.

ACTRA characterized as "outrageous" the producers’ offer of a 0 per cent, 0 per cent and 1 per cent wage increase for people working on Canadian productions.

The union also said the producers maintained contract requirements that "amount to demanding work from Canadian performers on the Internet for free."

In earlier negotiations, ACTRA said it offered flexibility in the use of performances on the Internet, major wage concessions for low-budget independent Canadian producers and new flexible rules for reality television.

"We’re not going to give away the future for free. And we are not going to let our members’ pay continue to erode compared to other performers in North America," Waddell said, adding he’d be willing to speak to producers any time, but is not optimistic a settlement can be reached.

Last Friday ACTRA voted 97.6 in favour of going on strike if its demands aren’t met.

Canadian stars such as Sarah Polley, Maria Del Mar, Wendy Crewson and Gordon Pinsent turned out to support the ACTRA’s negotiating team late Wednesday and early Thursday.

The strike would cover virtually all television and film work in Canada.

ACTRA averted a strike in the fall of 2001 after it reached an agreement with the association that represents the country’s film and TV producers.

The prospect of a strike led to a lull in work in the industry, then worth $4 billion. U.S. producers rushed to complete several projects being shot in Canada in the event of a threatened summer writers and actors strike in Hollywood, which never materialized. A looming Canadian strike compounded U.S. producers worries.

Between 75 and 80 per cent of the film and TV work in Canada is American-financed.

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Headline, Industry News

ACTRA days away from strike

TORONTO (CP) _ The union representing 21,000 film, television and radio workers across Canada said early Thursday a major labour disruption could be a few days away.

Talks between the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists, or ACTRA, and the producers’ organization broke down late Wednesday, said Stephen Waddell, the organization’s national executive director and chief negotiator.

"I very much regret that Canadian producers have decided to provoke a dispute in which they will be the principal victims," Waddell said.

"But given the conduct of their trade associations, we appear to be a few days away from a major disruption in Canada’s film and television industry."

ACTRA is in a legal strike position as of January 1, 2007 in most of Canada.

No new negotiations are scheduled.

The union’s main contentions centre around wage increases and the use of performances on the internet.

ACTRA characterized as "outrageous" the producers’ offer of a 0 per cent, 0 per cent and 1 per cent wage increase for people working on Canadian productions.

The union also said the producers maintained contract requirements that "amount to demanding work from Canadian performers on the Internet for free."

In earlier negotiations, ACTRA said it offered flexibility in the use of performances on the Internet, major wage concessions for low-budget independent Canadian producers and new flexible rules for reality television.

"We’re not going to give away the future for free. And we are not going to let our members’ pay continue to erode compared to other performers in North America," Waddell said, adding he’d be willing to speak to producers any time, but is not optimistic a settlement can be reached.

Last Friday ACTRA voted 97.6 in favour of going on strike if its demands aren’t met.

Canadian stars such as Sarah Polley, Maria Del Mar, Wendy Crewson and Gordon Pinsent turned out to support the ACTRA’s negotiating team late Wednesday and early Thursday.

The strike would cover virtually all television and film work in Canada.

ACTRA averted a strike in the fall of 2001 after it reached an agreement with the association that represents the country’s film and TV producers.

The prospect of a strike led to a lull in work in the industry, then worth $4 billion. U.S. producers rushed to complete several projects being shot in Canada in the event of a threatened summer writers and actors strike in Hollywood, which never materialized. A looming Canadian strike compounded U.S. producers worries.

Between 75 and 80 per cent of the film and TV work in Canada is American-financed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

ACTRA days away from strike

TORONTO (CP) _ The union representing 21,000 film, television and radio workers across Canada said early Thursday a major labour disruption could be a few days away.

Talks between the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists, or ACTRA, and the producers’ organization broke down late Wednesday, said Stephen Waddell, the organization’s national executive director and chief negotiator.

"I very much regret that Canadian producers have decided to provoke a dispute in which they will be the principal victims," Waddell said.

"But given the conduct of their trade associations, we appear to be a few days away from a major disruption in Canada’s film and television industry."

ACTRA is in a legal strike position as of January 1, 2007 in most of Canada.

No new negotiations are scheduled.

The union’s main contentions centre around wage increases and the use of performances on the internet.

ACTRA characterized as "outrageous" the producers’ offer of a 0 per cent, 0 per cent and 1 per cent wage increase for people working on Canadian productions.

The union also said the producers maintained contract requirements that "amount to demanding work from Canadian performers on the Internet for free."

In earlier negotiations, ACTRA said it offered flexibility in the use of performances on the Internet, major wage concessions for low-budget independent Canadian producers and new flexible rules for reality television.

"We’re not going to give away the future for free. And we are not going to let our members’ pay continue to erode compared to other performers in North America," Waddell said, adding he’d be willing to speak to producers any time, but is not optimistic a settlement can be reached.

Last Friday ACTRA voted 97.6 in favour of going on strike if its demands aren’t met.

Canadian stars such as Sarah Polley, Maria Del Mar, Wendy Crewson and Gordon Pinsent turned out to support the ACTRA’s negotiating team late Wednesday and early Thursday.

The strike would cover virtually all television and film work in Canada.

ACTRA averted a strike in the fall of 2001 after it reached an agreement with the association that represents the country’s film and TV producers.

The prospect of a strike led to a lull in work in the industry, then worth $4 billion. U.S. producers rushed to complete several projects being shot in Canada in the event of a threatened summer writers and actors strike in Hollywood, which never materialized. A looming Canadian strike compounded U.S. producers worries.

Between 75 and 80 per cent of the film and TV work in Canada is American-financed.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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