Oct 24, 2021
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Headline, Industry News

CRTC postpones local TV hearings; fee-for-carriage charges to cable operators

OTTAWA – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has postponed hearings on local TV station regulations, including those on whether big broadcasters like CTV and Global can charge cable operators to carry their signal.

The regulator said Tuesday that it would push back the hearing date to Nov. 16 from Sept. 29 to allow interested parties an opportunity to comment on the situation.

“By proceeding this way, the commission will ensure a fair, open and transparent hearing and remove any uncertainty on its outcome,” the CRTC said in a release.

The move comes after Bell Canada (TSX:BCE) filed a lawsuit with the federal court last week in an attempt to stop local TV stations from charging cable companies for carrying their signals, an issue known as fee for carriage.

Bell claimed that the CRTC has overstepped its jurisdiction, and asked a judge to intervene.

A spokesman for the regulator said the date change will also shift hearings for several other related issues that were planned for discussion at the same time, including financial requirements for local TV expenditures on domestic programming, and the transition to digital broadcast signals.

Source: The Canadian Press

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Headline, Industry News

CRTC postpones local TV hearings; fee-for-carriage charges to cable operators

OTTAWA – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has postponed hearings on local TV station regulations, including those on whether big broadcasters like CTV and Global can charge cable operators to carry their signal.

The regulator said Tuesday that it would push back the hearing date to Nov. 16 from Sept. 29 to allow interested parties an opportunity to comment on the situation.

“By proceeding this way, the commission will ensure a fair, open and transparent hearing and remove any uncertainty on its outcome,” the CRTC said in a release.

The move comes after Bell Canada (TSX:BCE) filed a lawsuit with the federal court last week in an attempt to stop local TV stations from charging cable companies for carrying their signals, an issue known as fee for carriage.

Bell claimed that the CRTC has overstepped its jurisdiction, and asked a judge to intervene.

A spokesman for the regulator said the date change will also shift hearings for several other related issues that were planned for discussion at the same time, including financial requirements for local TV expenditures on domestic programming, and the transition to digital broadcast signals.

Source: The Canadian Press

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

CRTC postpones local TV hearings; fee-for-carriage charges to cable operators

OTTAWA – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has postponed hearings on local TV station regulations, including those on whether big broadcasters like CTV and Global can charge cable operators to carry their signal.

The regulator said Tuesday that it would push back the hearing date to Nov. 16 from Sept. 29 to allow interested parties an opportunity to comment on the situation.

“By proceeding this way, the commission will ensure a fair, open and transparent hearing and remove any uncertainty on its outcome,” the CRTC said in a release.

The move comes after Bell Canada (TSX:BCE) filed a lawsuit with the federal court last week in an attempt to stop local TV stations from charging cable companies for carrying their signals, an issue known as fee for carriage.

Bell claimed that the CRTC has overstepped its jurisdiction, and asked a judge to intervene.

A spokesman for the regulator said the date change will also shift hearings for several other related issues that were planned for discussion at the same time, including financial requirements for local TV expenditures on domestic programming, and the transition to digital broadcast signals.

Source: The Canadian Press

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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