Aug 01, 2021
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U.K. set to lift product placement ban

Blighty looks certain to lift its ban on product placement in locally made commercial TV shows following a government U-turn.

Culture minister Ben Bradshaw, appointed this summer, is expected to use his speech Wednesday at the Royal Television Society’s biennial Cambridge Convention to announce a proposal that will bring British TV in line with the U.S. and many other Western markets.

A spokesman for cash-strapped commercial broadcaster ITV welcomed the news, saying, “If the government does decide to permit product placement, it will be warmly welcomed by the commercial broadcasting industry and advertisers alike.”

He said it would be a welcome acknowledgement of the “pressures faced by an industry in transition. New sources of revenue mean better-funded content — which can only be good news for viewers.”

It is estimated that lifting the ban could bring in around £100 million ($166 million) a year.

Ex-Endemol topper Peter Bazalgette said it was “hugely overdue.”

Writing in the Sunday Mirror paper he said product placement needed to be done transparently, with credits that made it clear it had taken place.

“But you have to trust the consumer,” he said. “If it’s overdone or tasteless, viewers will switch off.

He pointed out that auds are already familiar with product placement in American and Australian films and shows that air on TV in the U.K.

“And what about those sports events where sponsors’ logos are worn on shirts?” he added. “Product placement won’t dramatically change the way we watch TV.

The previous media minister, Andy Burnham, had consistently nixed product placement despite a European Union ruling allowing it in member states. He said it risked undermining British TV’s high standards. 

Once the ban is lifted, advertisers will be able to pay for their brands to be featured in high-profile fare like ITV’s flagship soap “Coronation Street.”

However, children’s programs will be exempt from the proposed new rules.

Source: Variety

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Headline, Industry News

U.K. set to lift product placement ban

Blighty looks certain to lift its ban on product placement in locally made commercial TV shows following a government U-turn.

Culture minister Ben Bradshaw, appointed this summer, is expected to use his speech Wednesday at the Royal Television Society’s biennial Cambridge Convention to announce a proposal that will bring British TV in line with the U.S. and many other Western markets.

A spokesman for cash-strapped commercial broadcaster ITV welcomed the news, saying, “If the government does decide to permit product placement, it will be warmly welcomed by the commercial broadcasting industry and advertisers alike.”

He said it would be a welcome acknowledgement of the “pressures faced by an industry in transition. New sources of revenue mean better-funded content — which can only be good news for viewers.”

It is estimated that lifting the ban could bring in around £100 million ($166 million) a year.

Ex-Endemol topper Peter Bazalgette said it was “hugely overdue.”

Writing in the Sunday Mirror paper he said product placement needed to be done transparently, with credits that made it clear it had taken place.

“But you have to trust the consumer,” he said. “If it’s overdone or tasteless, viewers will switch off.

He pointed out that auds are already familiar with product placement in American and Australian films and shows that air on TV in the U.K.

“And what about those sports events where sponsors’ logos are worn on shirts?” he added. “Product placement won’t dramatically change the way we watch TV.

The previous media minister, Andy Burnham, had consistently nixed product placement despite a European Union ruling allowing it in member states. He said it risked undermining British TV’s high standards. 

Once the ban is lifted, advertisers will be able to pay for their brands to be featured in high-profile fare like ITV’s flagship soap “Coronation Street.”

However, children’s programs will be exempt from the proposed new rules.

Source: Variety

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

U.K. set to lift product placement ban

Blighty looks certain to lift its ban on product placement in locally made commercial TV shows following a government U-turn.

Culture minister Ben Bradshaw, appointed this summer, is expected to use his speech Wednesday at the Royal Television Society’s biennial Cambridge Convention to announce a proposal that will bring British TV in line with the U.S. and many other Western markets.

A spokesman for cash-strapped commercial broadcaster ITV welcomed the news, saying, “If the government does decide to permit product placement, it will be warmly welcomed by the commercial broadcasting industry and advertisers alike.”

He said it would be a welcome acknowledgement of the “pressures faced by an industry in transition. New sources of revenue mean better-funded content — which can only be good news for viewers.”

It is estimated that lifting the ban could bring in around £100 million ($166 million) a year.

Ex-Endemol topper Peter Bazalgette said it was “hugely overdue.”

Writing in the Sunday Mirror paper he said product placement needed to be done transparently, with credits that made it clear it had taken place.

“But you have to trust the consumer,” he said. “If it’s overdone or tasteless, viewers will switch off.

He pointed out that auds are already familiar with product placement in American and Australian films and shows that air on TV in the U.K.

“And what about those sports events where sponsors’ logos are worn on shirts?” he added. “Product placement won’t dramatically change the way we watch TV.

The previous media minister, Andy Burnham, had consistently nixed product placement despite a European Union ruling allowing it in member states. He said it risked undermining British TV’s high standards. 

Once the ban is lifted, advertisers will be able to pay for their brands to be featured in high-profile fare like ITV’s flagship soap “Coronation Street.”

However, children’s programs will be exempt from the proposed new rules.

Source: Variety

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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