Oct 24, 2021
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The Canadian Society of Cinematographers’ Stereoscopic 3D Workshop

Course review by Diane Woods,
Special Assignment for TO411

Led by acclaimed U.K. Director of Photography Geoff Boyle, the participants of the 3D course (held February 5-8) were introduced to the theory and practicum of stereography and how they relate to storytelling. Various camera setups were used to investigate a variety of configurations including steadicam, remote head and crane, and utilizing a selection of 3D rigs. 

The rigs included “Quasar,” configured in both side by side and beamsplitter (provided by DJ Woods), “Beamsplitter Tango” (provided by 3D Camera Company), and the “Beamsplitter Mini Rig” (courtesy Geoff Boyle and Dark Country). The participants experimented with interocular (I/O), convergence and parallel versus converged systems. Course participants traveled from as far away as London and Hong Kong to attend. 

Speaker-Presenters included Brent Robinson, who spoke on theory and highlighted his experiences in underwater, convergence and stereography for 3D feature “Resident Evil: After Life”; Brian Gedge, DOP from “Saw 3D”; James Stewart, Producer-Director from Toronto’s Geneva Films, and US based Stereographer Paul Taylor.

Sebastien Laffoux representing the Tango rig, Michael Rintoul representing the Quasar rig, Jeff Packer, Dimetri Portelli, Chris Chung, Marcel Janisse, and Andrew Medicky all spoke to the left brain/right brain of 3D knowledge. 

Many of Geoff Boyle’s setups were staged to emphasize how to do it right. The final day was a trip to a post production facility in order to integrate lessons learned in the capture process while using a selection of 3D Post tools. 3D can be painful if done incorrectly and this group learned to do it right. At Creative Post, the group reviewed their shooting scenarios from the previous two days and then it was off to the AMC theatre to watch a screening of Geoff Boyle’s 3D thriller “Dark Country”. 

A big thank you was due to Morning Glory, Data Management Technician (DIT), who managed the data from three cameras shooting for two full days. Stereoscopic means two cameras and twice the recording data to manage.

Held at Pinewood Toronto Studios, the cameras, grip and lighting were provided by PS Production Services, William F. White, Sim Video, 3D Camera Company and DJ Woods. Overall coordination was carried out by PM Sarah Moffat who also ensured the course adhered to ‘green’ film policies.

Planning is underway for another course to be held in the fall.

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Headline, Industry News

The Canadian Society of Cinematographers’ Stereoscopic 3D Workshop

Course review by Diane Woods,
Special Assignment for TO411

Led by acclaimed U.K. Director of Photography Geoff Boyle, the participants of the 3D course (held February 5-8) were introduced to the theory and practicum of stereography and how they relate to storytelling. Various camera setups were used to investigate a variety of configurations including steadicam, remote head and crane, and utilizing a selection of 3D rigs. 

The rigs included “Quasar,” configured in both side by side and beamsplitter (provided by DJ Woods), “Beamsplitter Tango” (provided by 3D Camera Company), and the “Beamsplitter Mini Rig” (courtesy Geoff Boyle and Dark Country). The participants experimented with interocular (I/O), convergence and parallel versus converged systems. Course participants traveled from as far away as London and Hong Kong to attend. 

Speaker-Presenters included Brent Robinson, who spoke on theory and highlighted his experiences in underwater, convergence and stereography for 3D feature “Resident Evil: After Life”; Brian Gedge, DOP from “Saw 3D”; James Stewart, Producer-Director from Toronto’s Geneva Films, and US based Stereographer Paul Taylor.

Sebastien Laffoux representing the Tango rig, Michael Rintoul representing the Quasar rig, Jeff Packer, Dimetri Portelli, Chris Chung, Marcel Janisse, and Andrew Medicky all spoke to the left brain/right brain of 3D knowledge. 

Many of Geoff Boyle’s setups were staged to emphasize how to do it right. The final day was a trip to a post production facility in order to integrate lessons learned in the capture process while using a selection of 3D Post tools. 3D can be painful if done incorrectly and this group learned to do it right. At Creative Post, the group reviewed their shooting scenarios from the previous two days and then it was off to the AMC theatre to watch a screening of Geoff Boyle’s 3D thriller “Dark Country”. 

A big thank you was due to Morning Glory, Data Management Technician (DIT), who managed the data from three cameras shooting for two full days. Stereoscopic means two cameras and twice the recording data to manage.

Held at Pinewood Toronto Studios, the cameras, grip and lighting were provided by PS Production Services, William F. White, Sim Video, 3D Camera Company and DJ Woods. Overall coordination was carried out by PM Sarah Moffat who also ensured the course adhered to ‘green’ film policies.

Planning is underway for another course to be held in the fall.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

The Canadian Society of Cinematographers’ Stereoscopic 3D Workshop

Course review by Diane Woods,
Special Assignment for TO411

Led by acclaimed U.K. Director of Photography Geoff Boyle, the participants of the 3D course (held February 5-8) were introduced to the theory and practicum of stereography and how they relate to storytelling. Various camera setups were used to investigate a variety of configurations including steadicam, remote head and crane, and utilizing a selection of 3D rigs. 

The rigs included “Quasar,” configured in both side by side and beamsplitter (provided by DJ Woods), “Beamsplitter Tango” (provided by 3D Camera Company), and the “Beamsplitter Mini Rig” (courtesy Geoff Boyle and Dark Country). The participants experimented with interocular (I/O), convergence and parallel versus converged systems. Course participants traveled from as far away as London and Hong Kong to attend. 

Speaker-Presenters included Brent Robinson, who spoke on theory and highlighted his experiences in underwater, convergence and stereography for 3D feature “Resident Evil: After Life”; Brian Gedge, DOP from “Saw 3D”; James Stewart, Producer-Director from Toronto’s Geneva Films, and US based Stereographer Paul Taylor.

Sebastien Laffoux representing the Tango rig, Michael Rintoul representing the Quasar rig, Jeff Packer, Dimetri Portelli, Chris Chung, Marcel Janisse, and Andrew Medicky all spoke to the left brain/right brain of 3D knowledge. 

Many of Geoff Boyle’s setups were staged to emphasize how to do it right. The final day was a trip to a post production facility in order to integrate lessons learned in the capture process while using a selection of 3D Post tools. 3D can be painful if done incorrectly and this group learned to do it right. At Creative Post, the group reviewed their shooting scenarios from the previous two days and then it was off to the AMC theatre to watch a screening of Geoff Boyle’s 3D thriller “Dark Country”. 

A big thank you was due to Morning Glory, Data Management Technician (DIT), who managed the data from three cameras shooting for two full days. Stereoscopic means two cameras and twice the recording data to manage.

Held at Pinewood Toronto Studios, the cameras, grip and lighting were provided by PS Production Services, William F. White, Sim Video, 3D Camera Company and DJ Woods. Overall coordination was carried out by PM Sarah Moffat who also ensured the course adhered to ‘green’ film policies.

Planning is underway for another course to be held in the fall.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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