Oct 23, 2021
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Headline, Industry News

Newman’s departure from Global TV could signal wave of changes in broadcast news

TORONTO – News of Kevin Newman leaving Global Television’s national newscast has drawn a collective gasp of surprise from the broadcast industry, with media observers saying the veteran anchor’s departure could trigger a wave of exciting changes.

“The opportunities now to try something new and bold have never been greater for all of the broadcasters,” says Jeffrey Dvorkin, former head of news at CBC radio and National Public Radio.

Newman announced his departure late Friday, citing a “desire for rest and creative renewal.” His last newscast will be Aug. 20.

“There’s a lot of longevity in Canadian television news anchor circles, so the fact that he’s leaving after only 10 years is somewhat of a surprise,” says Dvorkin.

Newman, who leaves after one of Global’s most successful seasons, said he didn’t want to overstay his welcome. He has been vague on future plans, saying he intends to travel and complete several documentaries for Global.

His ambiguity hasn’t stopped others from speculating on where he might go next.

“There are a lot of questions around all of the broadcasters right now,” says Dvorkin. “I have heard rumours he might be moving to CTV, or to CBC.

More significantly however, Dvorkin says Newman’s departure has opened up a lively discussion on the future of country’s three national newscasts.

“Television news organizations are looking for some kind of formula that’s going to restore their profitability and their credibility and this is a really good time to have that discussion.”

Dvorkin notes that each network faces its own challenges.

Global is grappling with its finances following parent-company Canwest filing for bankruptcy protection last year. CTV has the challenge of eventually getting someone to replace longstanding and incredibly popular anchor Lloyd Robertson, and CBC is still working to re-cement its credibility after a series of cosmetic changes to the network last year.

But in an age where the clout carried by the nightly news anchor has somewhat diminished, Dvorkin says Newman’s departure will prompt a re-examination of the once iconic role.

“The question is how do you take that role of reliability and credibility and use it at a time when the Internet is changing how people get their news.”

For Global, Newman’s departure means a chance to do something new.

“When you are the third network, the place you are going to make your mark is by doing something different,” says Janice Neil, a Ryerson broadcast professor and Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journalism Project.

“So, it’s exciting.”

Neil adds that television news has dodged many of the crashing waves of change that print media has grappled with over the last 10 years. Newman’s departure, she says, might be a catalyst for innovation in broadcasting.

Newman’s announcement brought a flurry of messages from fellow broadcasters wishing him well.

A CTV statement quoted Robertson as saying Newman was “a great news anchor” while CBC’s Mansbridge said his Global counterpart always had his “admiration, respect and friendship.”

“He’s a great television journalist and that’s why it’s encouraging that he’s not closing any doors and clearly plans to keep some options open,” wrote Mansbridge in an email to the Canadian Press.

At 50, Newman is the youngest of the three national anchors, a factor that has prompted some talk of him taking over from 76-year-old Robertson at CTV.

But Neil says those discussions are more rumour than reality.

“It looks like Lloyd can stay as long as he wants to,” she says.

More importantly, Neil notes, CTV has already been grooming in-house talent to fill Robertson’s shoes with a familiar face when he does eventually step down.

“That kind of familiarity and credibility is hard to buy,” says Neil.

Though the industry and its audience is abuzz with Newman’s pending departure, the man himself has said little else on his decision.

A post on his Twitter account sums things up.

“After 10 amazing years August 20 will be my last Global National,” he tweets. “Lots of time to say good-bye.”

Source: The Canadian Press

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Headline, Industry News

Newman’s departure from Global TV could signal wave of changes in broadcast news

TORONTO – News of Kevin Newman leaving Global Television’s national newscast has drawn a collective gasp of surprise from the broadcast industry, with media observers saying the veteran anchor’s departure could trigger a wave of exciting changes.

“The opportunities now to try something new and bold have never been greater for all of the broadcasters,” says Jeffrey Dvorkin, former head of news at CBC radio and National Public Radio.

Newman announced his departure late Friday, citing a “desire for rest and creative renewal.” His last newscast will be Aug. 20.

“There’s a lot of longevity in Canadian television news anchor circles, so the fact that he’s leaving after only 10 years is somewhat of a surprise,” says Dvorkin.

Newman, who leaves after one of Global’s most successful seasons, said he didn’t want to overstay his welcome. He has been vague on future plans, saying he intends to travel and complete several documentaries for Global.

His ambiguity hasn’t stopped others from speculating on where he might go next.

“There are a lot of questions around all of the broadcasters right now,” says Dvorkin. “I have heard rumours he might be moving to CTV, or to CBC.

More significantly however, Dvorkin says Newman’s departure has opened up a lively discussion on the future of country’s three national newscasts.

“Television news organizations are looking for some kind of formula that’s going to restore their profitability and their credibility and this is a really good time to have that discussion.”

Dvorkin notes that each network faces its own challenges.

Global is grappling with its finances following parent-company Canwest filing for bankruptcy protection last year. CTV has the challenge of eventually getting someone to replace longstanding and incredibly popular anchor Lloyd Robertson, and CBC is still working to re-cement its credibility after a series of cosmetic changes to the network last year.

But in an age where the clout carried by the nightly news anchor has somewhat diminished, Dvorkin says Newman’s departure will prompt a re-examination of the once iconic role.

“The question is how do you take that role of reliability and credibility and use it at a time when the Internet is changing how people get their news.”

For Global, Newman’s departure means a chance to do something new.

“When you are the third network, the place you are going to make your mark is by doing something different,” says Janice Neil, a Ryerson broadcast professor and Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journalism Project.

“So, it’s exciting.”

Neil adds that television news has dodged many of the crashing waves of change that print media has grappled with over the last 10 years. Newman’s departure, she says, might be a catalyst for innovation in broadcasting.

Newman’s announcement brought a flurry of messages from fellow broadcasters wishing him well.

A CTV statement quoted Robertson as saying Newman was “a great news anchor” while CBC’s Mansbridge said his Global counterpart always had his “admiration, respect and friendship.”

“He’s a great television journalist and that’s why it’s encouraging that he’s not closing any doors and clearly plans to keep some options open,” wrote Mansbridge in an email to the Canadian Press.

At 50, Newman is the youngest of the three national anchors, a factor that has prompted some talk of him taking over from 76-year-old Robertson at CTV.

But Neil says those discussions are more rumour than reality.

“It looks like Lloyd can stay as long as he wants to,” she says.

More importantly, Neil notes, CTV has already been grooming in-house talent to fill Robertson’s shoes with a familiar face when he does eventually step down.

“That kind of familiarity and credibility is hard to buy,” says Neil.

Though the industry and its audience is abuzz with Newman’s pending departure, the man himself has said little else on his decision.

A post on his Twitter account sums things up.

“After 10 amazing years August 20 will be my last Global National,” he tweets. “Lots of time to say good-bye.”

Source: The Canadian Press

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

Newman’s departure from Global TV could signal wave of changes in broadcast news

TORONTO – News of Kevin Newman leaving Global Television’s national newscast has drawn a collective gasp of surprise from the broadcast industry, with media observers saying the veteran anchor’s departure could trigger a wave of exciting changes.

“The opportunities now to try something new and bold have never been greater for all of the broadcasters,” says Jeffrey Dvorkin, former head of news at CBC radio and National Public Radio.

Newman announced his departure late Friday, citing a “desire for rest and creative renewal.” His last newscast will be Aug. 20.

“There’s a lot of longevity in Canadian television news anchor circles, so the fact that he’s leaving after only 10 years is somewhat of a surprise,” says Dvorkin.

Newman, who leaves after one of Global’s most successful seasons, said he didn’t want to overstay his welcome. He has been vague on future plans, saying he intends to travel and complete several documentaries for Global.

His ambiguity hasn’t stopped others from speculating on where he might go next.

“There are a lot of questions around all of the broadcasters right now,” says Dvorkin. “I have heard rumours he might be moving to CTV, or to CBC.

More significantly however, Dvorkin says Newman’s departure has opened up a lively discussion on the future of country’s three national newscasts.

“Television news organizations are looking for some kind of formula that’s going to restore their profitability and their credibility and this is a really good time to have that discussion.”

Dvorkin notes that each network faces its own challenges.

Global is grappling with its finances following parent-company Canwest filing for bankruptcy protection last year. CTV has the challenge of eventually getting someone to replace longstanding and incredibly popular anchor Lloyd Robertson, and CBC is still working to re-cement its credibility after a series of cosmetic changes to the network last year.

But in an age where the clout carried by the nightly news anchor has somewhat diminished, Dvorkin says Newman’s departure will prompt a re-examination of the once iconic role.

“The question is how do you take that role of reliability and credibility and use it at a time when the Internet is changing how people get their news.”

For Global, Newman’s departure means a chance to do something new.

“When you are the third network, the place you are going to make your mark is by doing something different,” says Janice Neil, a Ryerson broadcast professor and Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journalism Project.

“So, it’s exciting.”

Neil adds that television news has dodged many of the crashing waves of change that print media has grappled with over the last 10 years. Newman’s departure, she says, might be a catalyst for innovation in broadcasting.

Newman’s announcement brought a flurry of messages from fellow broadcasters wishing him well.

A CTV statement quoted Robertson as saying Newman was “a great news anchor” while CBC’s Mansbridge said his Global counterpart always had his “admiration, respect and friendship.”

“He’s a great television journalist and that’s why it’s encouraging that he’s not closing any doors and clearly plans to keep some options open,” wrote Mansbridge in an email to the Canadian Press.

At 50, Newman is the youngest of the three national anchors, a factor that has prompted some talk of him taking over from 76-year-old Robertson at CTV.

But Neil says those discussions are more rumour than reality.

“It looks like Lloyd can stay as long as he wants to,” she says.

More importantly, Neil notes, CTV has already been grooming in-house talent to fill Robertson’s shoes with a familiar face when he does eventually step down.

“That kind of familiarity and credibility is hard to buy,” says Neil.

Though the industry and its audience is abuzz with Newman’s pending departure, the man himself has said little else on his decision.

A post on his Twitter account sums things up.

“After 10 amazing years August 20 will be my last Global National,” he tweets. “Lots of time to say good-bye.”

Source: The Canadian Press

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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