Oct 24, 2021
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CRTC chairman championed Canadian content on radio, TV

One of the great defenders of Canadian culture has died. Pierre Juneau died on Tuesday. He was 89.

Born in Montreal in 1922, Juneau began his career at the National Film Board of Canada, where he played a significant role in the development of French-language filmmaking at the federally funded film studio.

He was at the NFB from 1949 to 1966, holding various managerial positions related to distribution and production, including developing co-productions with France and Italy.

When an independent French-language production unit was set up at the NFB in 1964, he was the first director of the studio.

In 1960, he co-founded Quebec’s first film festival, the Montreal International Film Festival.

When he left the NFB in 1966, he was named vicechairman of the Bureau of Broadcast Governors, which became, in 1968, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the country’s broadcast regulator.

He became the first chairman of the CRTC in 1968 and it was under his guidance that the CRTC brought in Canadian-content regulations for television and radio, a move that most see as a key catalyst for the development of viable TV and music industries in this country.

The rules forced the TV networks to fill 60 per cent of their schedule with Canadian fare while the radio stations had to air 30 per cent Canadian music.

To underline his contribution to the music scene in Canada, the Juno Awards were named after him. He received a Juno Award as Canadian music industry man of the year in 1971.

An old friend of Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Juneau stepped down from the CRTC in 1975 to become Minister of Communications in Trudeau’s government.

But he had to resign from the cabinet after he lost a by-election in east-end Montreal.

Juneau became president of the CBC in 1982 and while head of the public broadcaster, he helped create the country’s first 24-hour all-news channel Newsworld.

But while running CBC, he had to deal with major budget cuts brought down by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney’s Progressive Conservative government. He had strained relations with that government.

“He was a great defender of Canadian content, a great defender of the public service and a great defender of the political independence of CBC vis-à-vis the government,” said Sylvain Lafrance, the former senior vice-president of Frenchlanguage services at CBC, in an interview with the Radio-Canada website.

During his tenure as head of CBC, he pushed to bring the Canadian content on the network up to 95 per cent. Juneau retired from CBC just as Newsworld was going to air.

He went on to teach in the communications department of the Université de Montréal and received honorary doctorates from York University, Ryerson Polytechnic University, Trent University, and Moncton University.

Following his stint at CBC, he founded the World Radio and Television Council, a UNESCO-supported non-government organization.

He received the Order of Canada in 1975 and was elected a member of the Royal Society of Canada.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Headline, Industry News

CRTC chairman championed Canadian content on radio, TV

One of the great defenders of Canadian culture has died. Pierre Juneau died on Tuesday. He was 89.

Born in Montreal in 1922, Juneau began his career at the National Film Board of Canada, where he played a significant role in the development of French-language filmmaking at the federally funded film studio.

He was at the NFB from 1949 to 1966, holding various managerial positions related to distribution and production, including developing co-productions with France and Italy.

When an independent French-language production unit was set up at the NFB in 1964, he was the first director of the studio.

In 1960, he co-founded Quebec’s first film festival, the Montreal International Film Festival.

When he left the NFB in 1966, he was named vicechairman of the Bureau of Broadcast Governors, which became, in 1968, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the country’s broadcast regulator.

He became the first chairman of the CRTC in 1968 and it was under his guidance that the CRTC brought in Canadian-content regulations for television and radio, a move that most see as a key catalyst for the development of viable TV and music industries in this country.

The rules forced the TV networks to fill 60 per cent of their schedule with Canadian fare while the radio stations had to air 30 per cent Canadian music.

To underline his contribution to the music scene in Canada, the Juno Awards were named after him. He received a Juno Award as Canadian music industry man of the year in 1971.

An old friend of Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Juneau stepped down from the CRTC in 1975 to become Minister of Communications in Trudeau’s government.

But he had to resign from the cabinet after he lost a by-election in east-end Montreal.

Juneau became president of the CBC in 1982 and while head of the public broadcaster, he helped create the country’s first 24-hour all-news channel Newsworld.

But while running CBC, he had to deal with major budget cuts brought down by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney’s Progressive Conservative government. He had strained relations with that government.

“He was a great defender of Canadian content, a great defender of the public service and a great defender of the political independence of CBC vis-à-vis the government,” said Sylvain Lafrance, the former senior vice-president of Frenchlanguage services at CBC, in an interview with the Radio-Canada website.

During his tenure as head of CBC, he pushed to bring the Canadian content on the network up to 95 per cent. Juneau retired from CBC just as Newsworld was going to air.

He went on to teach in the communications department of the Université de Montréal and received honorary doctorates from York University, Ryerson Polytechnic University, Trent University, and Moncton University.

Following his stint at CBC, he founded the World Radio and Television Council, a UNESCO-supported non-government organization.

He received the Order of Canada in 1975 and was elected a member of the Royal Society of Canada.

Source: Vancouver Sun

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

CRTC chairman championed Canadian content on radio, TV

One of the great defenders of Canadian culture has died. Pierre Juneau died on Tuesday. He was 89.

Born in Montreal in 1922, Juneau began his career at the National Film Board of Canada, where he played a significant role in the development of French-language filmmaking at the federally funded film studio.

He was at the NFB from 1949 to 1966, holding various managerial positions related to distribution and production, including developing co-productions with France and Italy.

When an independent French-language production unit was set up at the NFB in 1964, he was the first director of the studio.

In 1960, he co-founded Quebec’s first film festival, the Montreal International Film Festival.

When he left the NFB in 1966, he was named vicechairman of the Bureau of Broadcast Governors, which became, in 1968, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the country’s broadcast regulator.

He became the first chairman of the CRTC in 1968 and it was under his guidance that the CRTC brought in Canadian-content regulations for television and radio, a move that most see as a key catalyst for the development of viable TV and music industries in this country.

The rules forced the TV networks to fill 60 per cent of their schedule with Canadian fare while the radio stations had to air 30 per cent Canadian music.

To underline his contribution to the music scene in Canada, the Juno Awards were named after him. He received a Juno Award as Canadian music industry man of the year in 1971.

An old friend of Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Juneau stepped down from the CRTC in 1975 to become Minister of Communications in Trudeau’s government.

But he had to resign from the cabinet after he lost a by-election in east-end Montreal.

Juneau became president of the CBC in 1982 and while head of the public broadcaster, he helped create the country’s first 24-hour all-news channel Newsworld.

But while running CBC, he had to deal with major budget cuts brought down by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney’s Progressive Conservative government. He had strained relations with that government.

“He was a great defender of Canadian content, a great defender of the public service and a great defender of the political independence of CBC vis-à-vis the government,” said Sylvain Lafrance, the former senior vice-president of Frenchlanguage services at CBC, in an interview with the Radio-Canada website.

During his tenure as head of CBC, he pushed to bring the Canadian content on the network up to 95 per cent. Juneau retired from CBC just as Newsworld was going to air.

He went on to teach in the communications department of the Université de Montréal and received honorary doctorates from York University, Ryerson Polytechnic University, Trent University, and Moncton University.

Following his stint at CBC, he founded the World Radio and Television Council, a UNESCO-supported non-government organization.

He received the Order of Canada in 1975 and was elected a member of the Royal Society of Canada.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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