Dec 02, 2020
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New Indo-Canada treaty will boost local film industry

Local professionals associated with art, production and film industry hoped the new ‘Audiovisual Corporation Treaty’ between Canada and India will open up the Bollywood market to Canadian filmmakers on a larger scale.

The federal government announced that the Audiovisual Corporation Treaty between Canada and India will enter into force on July 1.

The treaty will allow producers to combine their creative, technical and financial resources to carry out audiovisual co-productions that will stimulate the economy and enhance knowledge sharing between the two countries.

“Our government has actively set out to make Canada a coproduction partner of choice and an even better place to do business,” said Shelly Glover, minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. “The treaty will make Canada a partner of choice in audiovisual coproduction while contributing to the cultures and economies of Canada and India.”

Vikas Kohli, a Mississauga-based composer from FatLabs and producer of Bollywood Monster Mashup, said the agreement should open up the massive Indian film market to Canadian filmmakers and‎ provide incentives for Indian productions to use Canadian talent.

“I’m excited to see more films on larger scales for our fellow Canadian composers and film makers. As a music creator, I will be keeping an eye on whether Indian production companies adapt to our well-established Canadian copyright laws. On the flip side, as Canadians, we’ll need to adapt to the fast pace of this massive international market,” said Kohli.

In the past 10 years alone, Canada has produced close to 681 audiovisual co-productions, with total production budgets of close to $5 billion.

In 2012-13, Canada’s audiovisual sector generated $5.82 billion for the Canadian economy, and approximately 127,700 jobs.

The treaty co-production represents significant opportunities for Canada’s competitiveness and prosperity.

It also attracts foreign investment to the sector, provides stronger support to those working in the audiovisual sector, employs Canadians, taps into foreign markets, and helps realize artistic and technical visions that would not otherwise be made.

This is the first treaty to be concluded since Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction was implemented in March 2013. This policy reflects the changing environment of audiovisual production, allowing Ottawa to better support the Canadian audiovisual industry and makes Canada an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice.

Source: Brampton Guardian

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Headline, Industry News

New Indo-Canada treaty will boost local film industry

Local professionals associated with art, production and film industry hoped the new ‘Audiovisual Corporation Treaty’ between Canada and India will open up the Bollywood market to Canadian filmmakers on a larger scale.

The federal government announced that the Audiovisual Corporation Treaty between Canada and India will enter into force on July 1.

The treaty will allow producers to combine their creative, technical and financial resources to carry out audiovisual co-productions that will stimulate the economy and enhance knowledge sharing between the two countries.

“Our government has actively set out to make Canada a coproduction partner of choice and an even better place to do business,” said Shelly Glover, minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. “The treaty will make Canada a partner of choice in audiovisual coproduction while contributing to the cultures and economies of Canada and India.”

Vikas Kohli, a Mississauga-based composer from FatLabs and producer of Bollywood Monster Mashup, said the agreement should open up the massive Indian film market to Canadian filmmakers and‎ provide incentives for Indian productions to use Canadian talent.

“I’m excited to see more films on larger scales for our fellow Canadian composers and film makers. As a music creator, I will be keeping an eye on whether Indian production companies adapt to our well-established Canadian copyright laws. On the flip side, as Canadians, we’ll need to adapt to the fast pace of this massive international market,” said Kohli.

In the past 10 years alone, Canada has produced close to 681 audiovisual co-productions, with total production budgets of close to $5 billion.

In 2012-13, Canada’s audiovisual sector generated $5.82 billion for the Canadian economy, and approximately 127,700 jobs.

The treaty co-production represents significant opportunities for Canada’s competitiveness and prosperity.

It also attracts foreign investment to the sector, provides stronger support to those working in the audiovisual sector, employs Canadians, taps into foreign markets, and helps realize artistic and technical visions that would not otherwise be made.

This is the first treaty to be concluded since Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction was implemented in March 2013. This policy reflects the changing environment of audiovisual production, allowing Ottawa to better support the Canadian audiovisual industry and makes Canada an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice.

Source: Brampton Guardian

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

New Indo-Canada treaty will boost local film industry

Local professionals associated with art, production and film industry hoped the new ‘Audiovisual Corporation Treaty’ between Canada and India will open up the Bollywood market to Canadian filmmakers on a larger scale.

The federal government announced that the Audiovisual Corporation Treaty between Canada and India will enter into force on July 1.

The treaty will allow producers to combine their creative, technical and financial resources to carry out audiovisual co-productions that will stimulate the economy and enhance knowledge sharing between the two countries.

“Our government has actively set out to make Canada a coproduction partner of choice and an even better place to do business,” said Shelly Glover, minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. “The treaty will make Canada a partner of choice in audiovisual coproduction while contributing to the cultures and economies of Canada and India.”

Vikas Kohli, a Mississauga-based composer from FatLabs and producer of Bollywood Monster Mashup, said the agreement should open up the massive Indian film market to Canadian filmmakers and‎ provide incentives for Indian productions to use Canadian talent.

“I’m excited to see more films on larger scales for our fellow Canadian composers and film makers. As a music creator, I will be keeping an eye on whether Indian production companies adapt to our well-established Canadian copyright laws. On the flip side, as Canadians, we’ll need to adapt to the fast pace of this massive international market,” said Kohli.

In the past 10 years alone, Canada has produced close to 681 audiovisual co-productions, with total production budgets of close to $5 billion.

In 2012-13, Canada’s audiovisual sector generated $5.82 billion for the Canadian economy, and approximately 127,700 jobs.

The treaty co-production represents significant opportunities for Canada’s competitiveness and prosperity.

It also attracts foreign investment to the sector, provides stronger support to those working in the audiovisual sector, employs Canadians, taps into foreign markets, and helps realize artistic and technical visions that would not otherwise be made.

This is the first treaty to be concluded since Canada’s Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction was implemented in March 2013. This policy reflects the changing environment of audiovisual production, allowing Ottawa to better support the Canadian audiovisual industry and makes Canada an audiovisual coproduction partner of choice.

Source: Brampton Guardian

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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