Sep 20, 2019
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Canadian Cinema Editors recognize Toronto film, documentary and television editor Roushell Goldstein

As part of the Canadian Cinema Editors Annual Awards, Thursday, June 2, Canadian Cinema Editors will pay tribute to the work and career of film, documentary and television editor Roushell Goldstein.

Goldstein, a St. Clair Avenue West and Oakwood Avenue-area resident, began her career in Jerusalem at the newly established Israel Television Network in the late 1960s. She returned to Canada in 1973 where she worked with Hobel-Leiterman Productions creating weekly documentaries in a series called ‘Here Comes the ’70s’ and ‘Target the Impossible.’

Goldstein has freelanced for CTV, CBC, the National Film Board of Canada and many privately funded productions, creating documentaries, television one-offs and series, as well as feature films. Career highlights include, the film ‘Raoul Wallenberg: Buried Alive,’ which won the Genie for best documentary feature, and was short-listed for the Oscars; starting as an original team member on the set of the TV show Degrassi Junior High; and co-directing and editing the documentary ‘Half the Kingdom,’ among others.

The award ceremony takes place at The Hotel Delta, downtown Toronto. Goldstein took time out of her schedule to respond to a set of questions about her success in the film and television industry.

Q: What does this lifetime achievement award mean to you?

A: Recognition from my peers means a great deal to me for the 35 years in the film industry, especially since it has been quite a while since I retired from it.

Q: What has been your philosophy/approach to your work throughout your career?

A: Work unstintingly, try to get into the minds and hearts of the people in the film, present your points-of-view vigorously where there are differences of opinion with the filmmakers. Then concede to their wishes with the best of my abilities, because, after all, I am there to serve their vision in the long, complicated process of making a film.

Q: In your opinion, what attributes/skills must a person have to be successful in a film career, such as the one you’ve had?

A: The ability to listen and empathize.

Q: Do you have a stand out career moment or project you’ve worked on?

A: There have been many. ‘Half the Kingdom’ – because I helped conceive it as a co-director, as well as an editor. My daughter Sarah’s baby naming opens the film. As a Jewish feminist, there was much to identify with.

‘Raoul Wallenberg: Buried Alive,’ because, as a person who lost family members in the Holocaust, I deeply appreciate the courage of people who defied the Nazi regime and fought the prevailing Anti-Semitism running rampant throughout Europe at that time.

‘Hurt Penguins,’ because it is one of the funniest and best written comedies to come out of Canada. I lived with this project long before the editing: My husband, Robert Bergman, was the co-producer and co-director.

‘Paris, France,’ because it was a challenge to get into the hearts and minds of the characters, but working with the consummate director, Jerry Ciccoritti, was sheer pleasure.

Q: When did you realize that you wanted to make film a career?

A: As a teenager, excited by the “New Wave” cinema from Europe and the controversial and powerful documentaries from “This Hour Has Seven Days” on CBC TV.

Source: Inside Toronto

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Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Canadian Cinema Editors recognize Toronto film, documentary and television editor Roushell Goldstein

As part of the Canadian Cinema Editors Annual Awards, Thursday, June 2, Canadian Cinema Editors will pay tribute to the work and career of film, documentary and television editor Roushell Goldstein.

Goldstein, a St. Clair Avenue West and Oakwood Avenue-area resident, began her career in Jerusalem at the newly established Israel Television Network in the late 1960s. She returned to Canada in 1973 where she worked with Hobel-Leiterman Productions creating weekly documentaries in a series called ‘Here Comes the ’70s’ and ‘Target the Impossible.’

Goldstein has freelanced for CTV, CBC, the National Film Board of Canada and many privately funded productions, creating documentaries, television one-offs and series, as well as feature films. Career highlights include, the film ‘Raoul Wallenberg: Buried Alive,’ which won the Genie for best documentary feature, and was short-listed for the Oscars; starting as an original team member on the set of the TV show Degrassi Junior High; and co-directing and editing the documentary ‘Half the Kingdom,’ among others.

The award ceremony takes place at The Hotel Delta, downtown Toronto. Goldstein took time out of her schedule to respond to a set of questions about her success in the film and television industry.

Q: What does this lifetime achievement award mean to you?

A: Recognition from my peers means a great deal to me for the 35 years in the film industry, especially since it has been quite a while since I retired from it.

Q: What has been your philosophy/approach to your work throughout your career?

A: Work unstintingly, try to get into the minds and hearts of the people in the film, present your points-of-view vigorously where there are differences of opinion with the filmmakers. Then concede to their wishes with the best of my abilities, because, after all, I am there to serve their vision in the long, complicated process of making a film.

Q: In your opinion, what attributes/skills must a person have to be successful in a film career, such as the one you’ve had?

A: The ability to listen and empathize.

Q: Do you have a stand out career moment or project you’ve worked on?

A: There have been many. ‘Half the Kingdom’ – because I helped conceive it as a co-director, as well as an editor. My daughter Sarah’s baby naming opens the film. As a Jewish feminist, there was much to identify with.

‘Raoul Wallenberg: Buried Alive,’ because, as a person who lost family members in the Holocaust, I deeply appreciate the courage of people who defied the Nazi regime and fought the prevailing Anti-Semitism running rampant throughout Europe at that time.

‘Hurt Penguins,’ because it is one of the funniest and best written comedies to come out of Canada. I lived with this project long before the editing: My husband, Robert Bergman, was the co-producer and co-director.

‘Paris, France,’ because it was a challenge to get into the hearts and minds of the characters, but working with the consummate director, Jerry Ciccoritti, was sheer pleasure.

Q: When did you realize that you wanted to make film a career?

A: As a teenager, excited by the “New Wave” cinema from Europe and the controversial and powerful documentaries from “This Hour Has Seven Days” on CBC TV.

Source: Inside Toronto

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Canadian Cinema Editors recognize Toronto film, documentary and television editor Roushell Goldstein

As part of the Canadian Cinema Editors Annual Awards, Thursday, June 2, Canadian Cinema Editors will pay tribute to the work and career of film, documentary and television editor Roushell Goldstein.

Goldstein, a St. Clair Avenue West and Oakwood Avenue-area resident, began her career in Jerusalem at the newly established Israel Television Network in the late 1960s. She returned to Canada in 1973 where she worked with Hobel-Leiterman Productions creating weekly documentaries in a series called ‘Here Comes the ’70s’ and ‘Target the Impossible.’

Goldstein has freelanced for CTV, CBC, the National Film Board of Canada and many privately funded productions, creating documentaries, television one-offs and series, as well as feature films. Career highlights include, the film ‘Raoul Wallenberg: Buried Alive,’ which won the Genie for best documentary feature, and was short-listed for the Oscars; starting as an original team member on the set of the TV show Degrassi Junior High; and co-directing and editing the documentary ‘Half the Kingdom,’ among others.

The award ceremony takes place at The Hotel Delta, downtown Toronto. Goldstein took time out of her schedule to respond to a set of questions about her success in the film and television industry.

Q: What does this lifetime achievement award mean to you?

A: Recognition from my peers means a great deal to me for the 35 years in the film industry, especially since it has been quite a while since I retired from it.

Q: What has been your philosophy/approach to your work throughout your career?

A: Work unstintingly, try to get into the minds and hearts of the people in the film, present your points-of-view vigorously where there are differences of opinion with the filmmakers. Then concede to their wishes with the best of my abilities, because, after all, I am there to serve their vision in the long, complicated process of making a film.

Q: In your opinion, what attributes/skills must a person have to be successful in a film career, such as the one you’ve had?

A: The ability to listen and empathize.

Q: Do you have a stand out career moment or project you’ve worked on?

A: There have been many. ‘Half the Kingdom’ – because I helped conceive it as a co-director, as well as an editor. My daughter Sarah’s baby naming opens the film. As a Jewish feminist, there was much to identify with.

‘Raoul Wallenberg: Buried Alive,’ because, as a person who lost family members in the Holocaust, I deeply appreciate the courage of people who defied the Nazi regime and fought the prevailing Anti-Semitism running rampant throughout Europe at that time.

‘Hurt Penguins,’ because it is one of the funniest and best written comedies to come out of Canada. I lived with this project long before the editing: My husband, Robert Bergman, was the co-producer and co-director.

‘Paris, France,’ because it was a challenge to get into the hearts and minds of the characters, but working with the consummate director, Jerry Ciccoritti, was sheer pleasure.

Q: When did you realize that you wanted to make film a career?

A: As a teenager, excited by the “New Wave” cinema from Europe and the controversial and powerful documentaries from “This Hour Has Seven Days” on CBC TV.

Source: Inside Toronto

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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