Dec 04, 2020
Visit our sister site:

Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Toronto film industry board questions proposed Expo 2025 location

The private-sector company hoping to bring World Expo 2025 to Toronto found itself facing a tough audience at city hall Friday: Film and television industry experts who were clearly skeptical about the fair’s proposed location.

The World Expo Canada Bid Corp., led by former Waterfront Toronto head John Campbell, wants to bring Expo to the Port Lands, near the mouth of the Don River in 2025.

The problem is, that neighbourhood already has tenants — the city’s film and television studios, many of whose executives sit on the city’s Film, Television and Digital Media Board.

The corporation and its consultants met with board members at city hall to update them on the progress of a feasibility study, due to be made public next month. But the board members seemed unconvinced about the proposed location, questioning at one point whether the film industry in the Port Lands could survive at all, should their district be transformed into an international fair for the better part of a year.

“It’s not SARS; it’s not an infection,” replied Alfredo Romano, who is the Pinewood Studios founder, but also a member of the Expo corporation advisory committee. “It’s a progressive, city-building event that would include the film industry.”

‘A good place to avoid’

The film board members are concerned that the construction for the world’s fair could disrupt their existing businesses, which generate about $1.5 billion a year. They also wonder how an influx of 22 million to 72 million people, which an Expo could attract, would interfere with filming.

“Hollywood is very sensitive to big name events at the possible places it might want to do business,” said film board member Douglas Barrett. “Folks in L.A. will think, ‘That’s a good place to avoid.’ So it’ll take years of counter-marketing to change that perception.”

The consortium countered that a successful bid for Expo 2025 would accelerate the construction of new roads and sewers, transit and utilities in the film district, which would be healthy for the industries that are located there.

Their feasibility study is due to be presented to city staff in October. It will be debated at the mayor’s executive committee meeting on October 26. If the study is approved by the executive committee, it will be presented to city council in early November.

Source: CBC

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Toronto film industry board questions proposed Expo 2025 location

The private-sector company hoping to bring World Expo 2025 to Toronto found itself facing a tough audience at city hall Friday: Film and television industry experts who were clearly skeptical about the fair’s proposed location.

The World Expo Canada Bid Corp., led by former Waterfront Toronto head John Campbell, wants to bring Expo to the Port Lands, near the mouth of the Don River in 2025.

The problem is, that neighbourhood already has tenants — the city’s film and television studios, many of whose executives sit on the city’s Film, Television and Digital Media Board.

The corporation and its consultants met with board members at city hall to update them on the progress of a feasibility study, due to be made public next month. But the board members seemed unconvinced about the proposed location, questioning at one point whether the film industry in the Port Lands could survive at all, should their district be transformed into an international fair for the better part of a year.

“It’s not SARS; it’s not an infection,” replied Alfredo Romano, who is the Pinewood Studios founder, but also a member of the Expo corporation advisory committee. “It’s a progressive, city-building event that would include the film industry.”

‘A good place to avoid’

The film board members are concerned that the construction for the world’s fair could disrupt their existing businesses, which generate about $1.5 billion a year. They also wonder how an influx of 22 million to 72 million people, which an Expo could attract, would interfere with filming.

“Hollywood is very sensitive to big name events at the possible places it might want to do business,” said film board member Douglas Barrett. “Folks in L.A. will think, ‘That’s a good place to avoid.’ So it’ll take years of counter-marketing to change that perception.”

The consortium countered that a successful bid for Expo 2025 would accelerate the construction of new roads and sewers, transit and utilities in the film district, which would be healthy for the industries that are located there.

Their feasibility study is due to be presented to city staff in October. It will be debated at the mayor’s executive committee meeting on October 26. If the study is approved by the executive committee, it will be presented to city council in early November.

Source: CBC

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Toronto film industry board questions proposed Expo 2025 location

The private-sector company hoping to bring World Expo 2025 to Toronto found itself facing a tough audience at city hall Friday: Film and television industry experts who were clearly skeptical about the fair’s proposed location.

The World Expo Canada Bid Corp., led by former Waterfront Toronto head John Campbell, wants to bring Expo to the Port Lands, near the mouth of the Don River in 2025.

The problem is, that neighbourhood already has tenants — the city’s film and television studios, many of whose executives sit on the city’s Film, Television and Digital Media Board.

The corporation and its consultants met with board members at city hall to update them on the progress of a feasibility study, due to be made public next month. But the board members seemed unconvinced about the proposed location, questioning at one point whether the film industry in the Port Lands could survive at all, should their district be transformed into an international fair for the better part of a year.

“It’s not SARS; it’s not an infection,” replied Alfredo Romano, who is the Pinewood Studios founder, but also a member of the Expo corporation advisory committee. “It’s a progressive, city-building event that would include the film industry.”

‘A good place to avoid’

The film board members are concerned that the construction for the world’s fair could disrupt their existing businesses, which generate about $1.5 billion a year. They also wonder how an influx of 22 million to 72 million people, which an Expo could attract, would interfere with filming.

“Hollywood is very sensitive to big name events at the possible places it might want to do business,” said film board member Douglas Barrett. “Folks in L.A. will think, ‘That’s a good place to avoid.’ So it’ll take years of counter-marketing to change that perception.”

The consortium countered that a successful bid for Expo 2025 would accelerate the construction of new roads and sewers, transit and utilities in the film district, which would be healthy for the industries that are located there.

Their feasibility study is due to be presented to city staff in October. It will be debated at the mayor’s executive committee meeting on October 26. If the study is approved by the executive committee, it will be presented to city council in early November.

Source: CBC

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisements